Untrained female staff irk customers

Updated 19 September 2014
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Untrained female staff irk customers

Several customers have complained that the newly appointed female work force, which was hired in a bid to reduce dependency on expat male employees and to check a soaring 34 percent unemployment rate among Saudi women, lacks training and customer sales experience.
While many have commended the country’s nationalization program, customers have nonetheless complained of a less rewarding shopping experience thanks to lack of training.
Mashael Al-Ansary, a university student, said that the increase in the number of women working is a positive step for the Kingdom, but that these women just do not have the same work ethic as men.
“Workers from the Philippines have excellent customer service attitude,” she said. “Unfortunately, the quality of service has dropped since these women are not trained to handle clients.”
Dina Fathallah, an accounts executive, experienced a lack of assistance from female employees while shopping.
“Saleswomen are not familiar with the products and I can confidently say they aren’t trained or have a professional attitude, which is required in client servicing,” she said.
The expat community in the Kingdom also thinks that the language barrier plays a major role in women employees’ inability at providing quality service.
Khairia Iqbal, an English teacher, said: “Saleswomen must learn how to speak English to deal with expats because many of us do not speak Arabic, which leads to confusion when communicating with them.”
She also suggested that work efficiency should be stressed prior to hiring women.
“I prefer not to deal with female cashiers since many of them are not familiar with how cash registers function,” she said.
Sana Siddiqui, an IT professional, suggested that companies provide specific training to female employees and place emphasis on work ethic, customer service, communication skills and product information.
“The government can also provide free workshops for working women, which has been implemented in China through providing classes for employees, especially those being hired abroad.”
Customers also find it difficult to distinguish between customers and saleswomen since they all wear black abayas.
“Employees should wear a recognizable headscarf with a big nametag in order for us to be able to spot them easily,” Siddiqui said.


Kingdom's anti-corruption chief leads Saudi delegation at UN General Assembly

Dr. Khalid bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Muhaisen, president of Nazaha and head of the Saudi delegation, will stress the Kingdom’s anti-corruption efforts locally and internationally. (Shutterstock)
Updated 20 min 59 sec ago
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Kingdom's anti-corruption chief leads Saudi delegation at UN General Assembly

  • The meeting will be attended by UNGA President Miroslav Lajcak, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Yuri Fedotov, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia, represented by a delegation from the National Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha), will take part on Wednesday in a high-level meeting of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) to mark 15 years since the adoption of the UN Convention against Corruption. 

The meeting will be attended by UNGA President Miroslav Lajcak, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Yuri Fedotov, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.

The opening session will discuss the most notable developments and best practices in the application of the UN Convention against Corruption, which has been adopted by 184 countries, including Saudi Arabia. The meeting will conclude with a speech by Lajcak.

Dr. Khalid bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Muhaisen, president of Nazaha and head of the Saudi delegation, will stress the Kingdom’s anti-corruption efforts locally and internationally.