Cabinet shake-up puts 9 new ministers at the helm

Updated 10 December 2014
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Cabinet shake-up puts 9 new ministers at the helm

Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah on Monday announced a major Cabinet reshuffle, removing six ministers and appointing eight new ministers for health, higher education, transport, agriculture, social affairs, communications and information technology, culture and information, and Islamic affairs. The current oil and finance ministers would remain in place. The vacant health post has now been filled with Mohammed Alhayazie, former rector of Jazan University. Abdul Aziz Al-Khodairy, former chief executive officer of King Abdullah Public Education Development Project (Tatweer), takes over the vacant culture and information post. King Abdullah appointed Khaled Al-Sabti new higher education minister replacing Khaled bin Mohammed Al-Anqari. Al-Sabti was the deputy minister of education. Sulaiman Al-Humaid is the new social affairs minister, replacing Yousuf bin Ahmad Al-Othaimeen. Al-Humaid was a member of the Shoura Council and a former governor of the General Organization of Social Insurance. Fahaad Al-Hamad becomes new minister of communications and information technology, replacing Mohammed Jamil bin Ahmad Mulla. Al-Hamad was the assistant chairman of the Shoura Council. Abdullah Al-Muqbil is the new minister of transport replacing Jabara Al-Seraisry. Al-Muqbil was the mayor of Riyadh. Walid Al-Khereiji becomes agriculture minister replacing Fahd bin Abdulrahman Balghuneim. Al-Khereiji was president of the Grain Silos and Flour Mills Organization. Sulaiman Abalkhail is the new Islamic Affairs minister, replacing Saleh Al-Asheikh. The king appointed Essam bin Saad bin Saeed a state minister in addition to his current position as the chief of Cabinet’s Experts Commission. In the decrees related to security commanders, the King ordered the promotion of Maj. Gen. Sulaiman bin Abdullah Al-Amr, director general of the Civil Defense, to the rank of lieutenant general, and Maj. Gen. Othman Al-Muhrij, director general of public security, to the rank of lieutenant general.


More than 1.25 million foreigners arrested in KSA for flouting residential, labor laws

In this file photo, expatriate workers are seen outside a Labor Ministry office in Riyadh to fix their status in the Kingdom. In the past seven months, Saudi authorities have arrested more than 1.25 foreigners for violating residential and labor laws. (AFP)
Updated 19 June 2018
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More than 1.25 million foreigners arrested in KSA for flouting residential, labor laws

  • Of the total arrested, 931,069 were violators of residential regulations,  218,897 for flouting labor laws and 102,000 tried to gain entry into the Kingdom illegally.
  • The crackdown started on November 16 last year and ended on June 14.

JEDDAH: More than 1.25 million people were arrested in Saudi Arabia for violating residential, labor and border security regulations during the Kingdom’s months-long campaign.

The crackdown, which started on November 16 last year and ended on June 14, saw the arrests of 1,251,966 people in the joint security field campaign across the Kingdom. Those arrested included 931,069 violators of residential regulations, 218,897 for flouting labor laws and 102,000 violators of border security regulations.

The total number of people arrested attempting to cross the Kingdom’s borders stood at 19,233 people. Of those arrested, 54 percent were Yemenis, 43 percent Ethiopian, and 3 percent from other nations. 

The Kingdom also arrested 790 people who tried to leave the Kingdom illegally.

There were 2,167 people who were arrested for harboring and transporting violators of labor and security border regulations, and 415 citizens were arrested for transporting and sheltering expatriates violating regulations. Regulatory measures were taken against 388 citizens who were subsequently released. 

The number of expatriates currently detained stands at 10,245, including 8,817 men and 1,428 women. Immediate penalties were imposed on 221,404 violators while 177,329 violators were referred to their respective diplomatic missions for travel documents and 327,034 were deported.