KSA gives $1m in donation to Islamic Museum in Australia

Updated 02 March 2015
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KSA gives $1m in donation to Islamic Museum in Australia

The Kingdom has donated $1 million to the Islamic Museum in Australia (IMA). Presenting a check to Australian Foreign Minister Julie Joseph, Saudi Ambassador Nabil bin Mohammed Al-Saleh said the donation was given by the Saudi leadership in order to promote human values among nations in support of peaceful co-existence among all communities. Al-Saleh said that the Kingdom was interested in projecting the correct image of Islam.
The ceremony took place in Melbourne on the first anniversary of the Islamic Museum in Australia. In attendance were IMA President Ahmed Fahour and other distinguished guests.
Al-Saleh said the Saudi contribution would support the work of the museum in showing the characteristics of Islamic civilization and culture, which are characterized by diversity and are based on the principles of tolerance and peace.
The ambassador also appreciated the efforts of the Islamic Museum to expand to other states in Australia in order to spread its objectives.
Joseph thanked the Saudi government and the ambassador for taking continued measures to strengthen bilateral relations between the two countries.
In his remarks, the IMA chief thanked Custodian of the Two Holy mosques King Salman for the contribution, which will strengthen a better understanding of Islam.
The Islamic Museum was formally opened last year in Melbourne in the presence of the Australian minister of finance and the Saudi ambassador. A number of Australian officials and representatives of Islamic communities were also present.
The museum is a not-for-profit foundation founded in May 2010 for the establishment of the the first Islamic Museum in Australia. It aims to showcase the rich artistic heritage and contributions of Muslims in Australia and abroad through the display of artworks and artifacts.
The museum showcases a range of Islamic art, including architecture, calligraphy, paintings, glass, ceramics and textiles. Islamic arts date from the 7th century and include the different artistic styles and cultural influences of various cultures that came under Islamic rule. It also aims to promote new and established Islamic artists, both local and international.
The aim of the museum is to feature the artistic and historical achievements of Muslims internationally and more importantly in Australia. It will provide unique cross-cultural and educational services offering fascinating insights into the Muslim Australian experience for visitors and school groups.
The IMA aims to continue the proud tradition in Australia of working with communities, cultures, faiths and developing centers for education.
The center will provide educational and cross-cultural instruction and showcase the artistic and cultural heritage of Muslims in Australia and in Muslim societies everywhere. It aims to foster community harmony and facilitate an understanding of the values and contributions of Muslims to Australian society.
Its objective is to promote community harmony and mutual understanding by sharing the arts, history, culture and heritage of Muslim communities in Australia with the general public.


Plans afoot to expand teaching of Chinese in Saudi Arabia

Saudi Education Minister Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh. (SPA)
Updated 11 min 12 sec ago
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Plans afoot to expand teaching of Chinese in Saudi Arabia

  • Move to set up language learning in various stages of education in Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: The Ministry of Education launched the “Teaching Chinese Language in Education” workshop at the ministry’s headquarters in Riyadh on Saturday.
It was attended by the Chinese ambassador to the Kingdom, officials from the Chinese Embassy, presidents of Saudi universities and education officials in the Kingdom.
Saudi Education Minister Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Asheikh said that the inclusion of the Chinese language in the various stages of education in the Kingdom stemmed from the desire to diversify the language tools in education, based on the strategic and economic importance of the Chinese language now and in the future.
He also stressed the importance of having a clear plan to qualify a number of teachers in intensive programs for up to a year to teach Chinese for the target stages, which could include selected schools from the secondary level in different regions in the first three years.
“There is a plan for numerical expansion, based on the requirements and expansion of the intermediate educational stage,” he said. “This expansion should be accompanied by training a number of teachers in programs developed in cooperation with the Chinese side for a year and with the department of external education to qualify teachers to teach Chinese.”
King Saud University reviewed the experience of teaching the Chinese language in the workshop, indicating that it started to introduce Chinese in 2010, and has graduated 35 students so far. They are currently working in the ministries of foreign affairs, media and a number of military sectors. They were used in translation programs, accompanying Chinese delegations, and during the pilgrimage seasons.
“When we say China or the Chinese economy is expected to be the primary economy (in the world) in eight years, this means establishing a strong relationship with this economy based on the common interests of the two countries,” Al-Asheikh said.
He said that the overall strategic goal of teaching Chinese was to make it the third language parallel to English and with the same level of horizontal and vertical spread in the two education systems.
Al-Asheikh expressed his optimism about the strategic direction of increasing cooperation between the Kingdom and China as great economies and civilizations.