KSA gives $1m in donation to Islamic Museum in Australia

Updated 02 March 2015
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KSA gives $1m in donation to Islamic Museum in Australia

The Kingdom has donated $1 million to the Islamic Museum in Australia (IMA). Presenting a check to Australian Foreign Minister Julie Joseph, Saudi Ambassador Nabil bin Mohammed Al-Saleh said the donation was given by the Saudi leadership in order to promote human values among nations in support of peaceful co-existence among all communities. Al-Saleh said that the Kingdom was interested in projecting the correct image of Islam.
The ceremony took place in Melbourne on the first anniversary of the Islamic Museum in Australia. In attendance were IMA President Ahmed Fahour and other distinguished guests.
Al-Saleh said the Saudi contribution would support the work of the museum in showing the characteristics of Islamic civilization and culture, which are characterized by diversity and are based on the principles of tolerance and peace.
The ambassador also appreciated the efforts of the Islamic Museum to expand to other states in Australia in order to spread its objectives.
Joseph thanked the Saudi government and the ambassador for taking continued measures to strengthen bilateral relations between the two countries.
In his remarks, the IMA chief thanked Custodian of the Two Holy mosques King Salman for the contribution, which will strengthen a better understanding of Islam.
The Islamic Museum was formally opened last year in Melbourne in the presence of the Australian minister of finance and the Saudi ambassador. A number of Australian officials and representatives of Islamic communities were also present.
The museum is a not-for-profit foundation founded in May 2010 for the establishment of the the first Islamic Museum in Australia. It aims to showcase the rich artistic heritage and contributions of Muslims in Australia and abroad through the display of artworks and artifacts.
The museum showcases a range of Islamic art, including architecture, calligraphy, paintings, glass, ceramics and textiles. Islamic arts date from the 7th century and include the different artistic styles and cultural influences of various cultures that came under Islamic rule. It also aims to promote new and established Islamic artists, both local and international.
The aim of the museum is to feature the artistic and historical achievements of Muslims internationally and more importantly in Australia. It will provide unique cross-cultural and educational services offering fascinating insights into the Muslim Australian experience for visitors and school groups.
The IMA aims to continue the proud tradition in Australia of working with communities, cultures, faiths and developing centers for education.
The center will provide educational and cross-cultural instruction and showcase the artistic and cultural heritage of Muslims in Australia and in Muslim societies everywhere. It aims to foster community harmony and facilitate an understanding of the values and contributions of Muslims to Australian society.
Its objective is to promote community harmony and mutual understanding by sharing the arts, history, culture and heritage of Muslim communities in Australia with the general public.


King Salman’s support vital to national heritage achievements

The program aims to protect, promote and develop cultural heritage and make it part of the life and memory of citizens. (Supplied)
Updated 17 October 2018
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King Salman’s support vital to national heritage achievements

  • The Saudi leadership made key decisions to protect antiquities and historical sites
  • Saudi Arabia aims to conduct awareness campaigns, establish museums and develop them in a modern way to attract citizens and visitors

JEDDAH: The achievements made in Saudi Arabia’s national heritage sector, and the prizes and awards that have been won as result, are thanks to the support and efforts of King Salman, said Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH).
His comments came as the king received the Sharjah International Award for Cultural Heritage, which was awarded in recognition of the Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques cultural heritage program.
King Salman oversaw the creation of the antiquities and heritage sector 50 years ago and stood firmly against the elimination or extinction of archaeological and heritage sites, Prince Sultan said, and has made historical and important decisions to protect antiquities since the era of the late King Saud.
This support culminated in the adoption of the innovative Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques for the Care of Cultural Heritage program, implemented by the commission to bring about a qualitative shift in projects and programs devoted to national cultural heritage.
Prince Sultan said: “The award is a result of King Salman’s follow-up and support to the program, which the SCTH and our team have translated into projects and initiatives carried out in cooperation with highly professional partners, in order to preserve, restore and develop the national heritage and make it a reality that connects citizens to their country’s history and heritage.”
He said the SCTH has built upon the great efforts of the institutions that preceded it in taking care of the nation’s antiquities, as well as individual efforts to preserve national heritage.
“Today, we reap the fruits of these efforts: The culture we have learnt from King Salman and previous leaders, which has taught us to complete the work and loyalty of all those who built and achieved before us,” he said.
Dr. Sultan bin Mohammed Al-Qasimi, a member of the Federal Supreme Council and ruler of Sharjah, announced that the Sharjah International Award for Cultural Heritage had been awarded to the Custodian of The Two Holy Mosques Program for the Care of Cultural Heritage during a ceremony on April 22, 2018.
The program aims to protect, promote and develop cultural heritage and make it part of the life and memory of citizens. It also conducts awareness campaigns, establishes museums and develops them in a modern way to attract citizens and visitors, prepares Islamic historical sites to welcome visitors, and preserves culturally important buildings and towns to showcase the role of the Kingdom as a crossroads for civilizations through the ages and achieve a qualitative shift in the field, contributing to economic growth.