2,413 medical errors in a year

Updated 06 April 2015
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2,413 medical errors in a year

The number of recorded medical errors in the Kingdom amounted to 2,413 cases over a period of one year, with Riyadh and the Eastern Province accounting for 20 percent and 17.6 percent of the cases, respectively, according to official data.
The number of court hearings on medical errors reached 2,838. Twenty-six percent of these were in the Riyadh Province, according to the report which was published in a local daily.
Ali bin Mohammed Al-Quraishi, an international legal arbitrator and adviser, said that the forensic medical commissions are considered independent courts in terms of handling medical errors. There are currently 19 commissions distributed in seven regions and provinces, each headed by a judge who is nominated by the minister of justice.
Al-Quraishi said that these commissions are intended to protect patients from medical errors and that there is a mandatory insurance process to protect against medical malpractice for all doctors and dentists working in public and private health institutions.
Nagwa Mousa, a quality consultant, said that the concept of quality is designed to improve patient satisfaction and protect patients from medical errors. He noted that this is why regulations must be set up in order to stop medical malpractices through continuous inspections of medical facilities and health care centers.


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 18 November 2018
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”

But President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday that his administration would get “a very full report,” including who was responsible for Khashoggi’s death, on Monday or Tuesday.
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.