SR10,000 fine, 2-month prison for car drifters

Updated 21 May 2015
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SR10,000 fine, 2-month prison for car drifters

RIYADH: The Shoura Council recommended on Tuesday a fine of SR10,000 or two-month jail or both for car drifting.
During the 40th ordinary session of the Shoura Council, presided over by President Abdullah Al-Asheikh, the house approved amendments to penalties related to car-drifting crimes.
According to the new amendments, a car drifter shall be liable for penalties including imprisonment, fines and seizure of the vehicle for a specific period, extendable if drifting is repeated. The fine for the first offense shall begin at SR10,000 or imprisonment of not less than two months, or both.
Penalties shall also apply to those who have encouraged or provided financial support, or a spectator encouraging a car drifter with a fine of SR1,500 or seizure of the car for 15 days, or both.
Riyadh traffic police and research and investigation teams have been trying to eradicate the phenomenon of drifting, which involves modifying vehicles to make their motors more powerful, and racing other cars in the streets. Efforts by authorities have resulted in the reduction of accidents and drifting incidents.
Last year, Riyadh traffic police arrested more than 646 car drifters during a period of six months preceding November.
Authorities have called on parents to monitor their sons, urging them to help reduce the extreme results of drifting since most of these violators are young people.

— With input from Sharif M. Taha


Saudi university launches survey into the effects of women driving

Trainee Maria Al-Faraj practices changing a tire during a driving lesson at the Saudi Aramco Driving Center in Dhahran. Reuters/File
Updated 23 min 37 sec ago
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Saudi university launches survey into the effects of women driving

  • A scientific survey about cars and drivers is being distributed on social media outlets, targeting male and female citizens and residents
  • The data will be analyzed to help make recommendations to benefit the community and the interests of the country

JEDDAH: Researchers will observe and document the effects women driving in Saudi Arabia have on the economy, environment, community and traffic safety. It will also gather information about attitudes toward the change in the law, and the experience of women who get behind the wheel.
With the ban on women driving in the Kingdom due to be lifted on June 24, 2018, Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University in Dammam has launched a national study titled “The impact of women’s driving on sustainable development and traffic safety in the Kingdom.”
Researchers from the university, headed by Dr. Najah bint Moqbel Al-Qarawi, a professor of geography of transportation, will supervise the project in collaboration with a specialist team from the General Directorate of Traffic.
Al-Qarawi said that a scientific survey about cars and drivers is being distributed on social media outlets, targeting male and female citizens and residents from all parts of society, in cities and villages. The questionnaire will reveal how participants feel about the issue of women driving and the potential effects it will have.
It will also measure the extent of support for the move from men, while women will be asked about their means of transportation and the main problems they face. Women who want to drive will also be asked about driving, training, the process for getting a license, their fears and aspirations, and for suggestions that might make the process easier and more appealing.
The survey will be carried out in two stages, before and after women get behind the wheel.
The data will be analyzed to help make recommendations to benefit the community and the interests of the country.
Everyone who completes a survey will be entered in a draw to win one of several cars from Almajdouie car company.