Sri Lanka to cut recruiting charges for housemaids

Updated 27 May 2015
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Sri Lanka to cut recruiting charges for housemaids

RIYADH: Sri Lanka’s job agents have agreed to reduce the recruiting charges of housemaids from SR15000 to SR11,000 to sustain the Saudi market.
Speaking to Arab News during his visit to the capital, Faizer Mackeen, president of Association of Licensed Foreign Agencies (ALFEA), said that the members of the association have reached a consensus on decreasing the charges.
Mackeen said that there are more than 1,000 recruiting agents in Sri Lanka and only one fifth of them are authorized to send manpower to the Kingdom.
He said that the reduction in charges will be conveyed by the Sri Lankan government to its Saudi side when the Kingdom’s labor team visits the island before or after the month of Ramadan.
An average of 6,000 Lankan maids are arriving in the Kingdom every month and the reduction in the charges would help increase their number, he said. “All Saudi-bound domestic workers to the Kingdom are given three weeks of training, followed by an orientation program. We are pretty sure that these trained maids will fit into Saudi homes effectively.”
Teams from the Kingdom and Sri Lanka are expected to review the implementation of the labor agreement signed between the two countries in Riyadh early this year, Mackeen said.
“It is a comprehensive accord which protects both the employer and the employees,” he said, adding that under the new agreement, the original passports of domestic workers will be in their possession and their salaries will be remitted to their designated banks.


Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

Updated 25 May 2018
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Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

  • In the 9th year after Hijrah, as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
  • To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.

JEDDAH: Masjid Al-Izam (Mosque of the Bones) is a historic mosque in Al-Ula governorate, located 300 km north of Madinah.
In the ninth year after Hijrah (the emigration of Makkah’s Muslims to Madinah), as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla (the direction in which Muslims should pray) using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.
It was made of stone, and mud was used to cover its walls, but it has undergone several restorations.
“Mention of the mosque can be found in many renowned scientific sources,” Abdullah Kaber, a researcher in Madinah’s development authority, told the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
He said Masjid Al-Izam has attracted the attention of King Salman, who is focused on restoring a number of historic mosques across the Kingdom.
The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) is planning to develop tourism in Al-Ula since it houses many historical sites and relics.