Mosques to mute external speakers during prayers

Updated 06 June 2015
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Mosques to mute external speakers during prayers

JEDDAH: The Ministry of Islamic Affairs ordered mosques to shut down external speakers and only resort to the internal one, except during calls for prayers, Friday prayers, Eids and the rainfall prayer.
Mosque imams were prevented from installing echo devices and transmutation cutting devices as the ministry said that mosques' neighbors complained of the loud noise of the speakers and the interference of sounds from different mosques creating distortions.
The ministry instructed field workers to conduct visits to make sure that imams and preachers abide by the new regulations. The ministry issued a number of warnings and regulations for mosques during the holy month of Ramadan when it comes to prayers and breaking the fast.
The ministry advised mosque imams, who are commissioned to perform Taraweeh and Qiyam Al-Lail prayers during Ramadan, against long preaching times, rhymes and attacking sermons.
Regulations included preventing preaching activities in the mosques during Ramadan other than the officially permitted lectures and seminars. The ministry said there is a need to choose people other than the employed imams who memorize the Qur'an, with preference given to students and teachers from Qur'an teaching schools.
The ministry stressed the need to abide by the Adhan times according to Um Al-Qura time, making sure that the call for prayer is made without distortion.
The ministry started working with a number of preachers, scholars and university professors, through a number of lectures and seminars for employees and staff of 10 government agencies, to expose the risks of extremism and ideological splits.


Trump: Saudi arrests in Khashoggi death ‘a good first step’

Updated 20 October 2018
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Trump: Saudi arrests in Khashoggi death ‘a good first step’

  • Trump said that Saudi Arabia has been a great ally
  • The president said he wanted to talk to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on what to do next

LUKE AIR FORCE BASE, Arizona: US President Donald Trump on Friday called Saudi Arabia's announcement that suspects are in custody in the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi a "good first step" and said he would work with Congress on a US response.

The president spoke to the media at a defense roundtable in Arizona hours after Saudi Arabia claimed that Khashoggi, a Washington Post contributor last seen on Oct. 2, was killed in a "fistfight" at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The kingdom also said that 18 suspects were in custody and that intelligence officials had been fired.

Asked by a reporter whether he thought Saudi Arabia's explanation for Khashoggi's death was credible, Trump said, "I do. I do." But he said before he decided what to do next, he wanted to talk to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

"Saudi Arabia has been a great ally, but what happened is unacceptable," Trump said. Regarding the Saudi arrests, he said, "It's a big first step. It's only a first step, but it's a big first step."