4,000 Djibouti workers to arrive in KSA

Updated 03 July 2015

4,000 Djibouti workers to arrive in KSA

JEDDAH: Four thousand Djibouti workers are expected to arrive in the Kingdom over the next few months following the labor pact signed between the two countries last month.
Speaking to a local publication recently, Djibouti Ambassador Diaa Eddin Saeed Bamakhrama said employers have to pay a minimum monthly salary of SR800 with no cap, and a maximum of SR7,000 in recruitment costs.
The governments of the two countries would work to ensure that there are no drastic changes to the costs involved, Bamakhrama was quoted as saying. The workers arriving in the Kingdom would include maids, drivers and other domestic workers, he said.
Bamakhrama said Djibouti workers do not need extensive training, their language is similar to Arabic, they are Muslim, and share many of the traditions and customs of Arab societies. All workers would have to undergo medical tests before heading to the Kingdom, he said.
The Kingdom signed labor agreements with Djibouti and Niger earlier this month on the sidelines of the 104th session of the International Labor Organization.
Saudi Arabia has now signed labor agreements for the recruitment of domestic workers with eight nations including the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.
The Kingdom started issuing visas for Bangladeshi domestic workers beginning April 20. This follows a recruitment pact signed in March between the two governments.
Ahmed Al-Fahaid, deputy labor minister for international affairs, and Bangladesh Minister for Expatriate Welfare and Overseas Employment Khandker Mosharraf Hossain signed the agreement in Dhaka.
Bangladeshi workers are required to be in good health, have no criminal convictions and training in their professions. They must also be aware of the Kingdom’s religious and cultural environment and labor regulations.
At present, there are 1.2 million Bangladeshi workers in the Kingdom. The Kingdom recently lifted a 2008 ban on the hiring of workers from that country.
The Kingdom expects the agreements signed would streamline recruitment procedures, control costs, and facilitate and expedite procedures for the arrival of domestic workers.
Saudi Arabia’s Labor Ministry wants to limit the involvement of intermediaries in the recruitment process. The ministry now receives workers’ complaints in Arabic, English, Urdu, Hindi, Bahasa, Tagalog, Amharic, Malayalam and Bangla.


Saudi technical students to showcase skills at global contest

Updated 12 min 1 sec ago

Saudi technical students to showcase skills at global contest

  • ‘WorldSkills’ started in 1950 after the head of the Spanish Workers Union called for the organization of the first national vocational competition in Madrid

MOSCOW, Russia: Saudi students and experts will be showcasing their innovative skills in aircraft maintenance and welding during the “WorldSkills” competition to be held in Kazan, Russia on Thursday. 

The competition will run for six days and will see the participation of representatives from 75 countries.

“This is a biennial global competition during which more than 700 young men and women from 75 countries compete in 56 various categories,” said the CEO of Colleges of Excellence Dr. Fahad bin Abdul Aziz Al-Tuwaijri. 

The competition will run for six days and will see the participation of more than 700 young men and women from 75 countries. (SPA)

“The competition covers industrial and service professions with the highest international standards to promote technical and vocational training and raise awareness about the impact of such training.

“This competition aims to shed light on the importance of technical skills, encourage young people to acquire them, discover their skills and develop them and find cooperation opportunities among contestants and different sectors,” he added.

Those who qualified from international technical colleges and strategic partnership institutes were: Idris Abduljalil Al-Haji from the International Aviation Technical College (IATC) in Riyadh, Hassan Hussain Al-Rashid from the Saudi Technical Institute for Petroleum Services, aircraft maintenance expert Ibrahim Khalid Yamani from IATC, and welding expert engineer Ghazi Mohammed Al-Mustanir from the Saudi Technical Institute for Petroleum Services.

“Saudi students impressed the participants during previous local and international competitions,” Al-Tuwaijri said, adding “Yamani was chosen as the best aircraft maintenance expert during the 2017 competition held in Abu Dhabi.”

“WorldSkills” started in 1950 after the head of the Spanish Workers Union called for the organization of the first national vocational competition in Madrid.