Death-row Indonesian maid ‘nearing release’

Updated 26 July 2015
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Death-row Indonesian maid ‘nearing release’

RIYADH: The much-publicized case of Satinah binti Jumadi Ahmad, 41, an Indonesian maid jailed in Saudi Arabia since 2009 for killing her employer’s wife and stealing money, could be nearing an end soon.
“Indonesian Embassy officials will visit Buraidah next week to check the status of the case,” said Dede Achmad Rifai, an embassy official, here Saturday.
The maid is lodged in a jail in Buraidah. The Indonesian government has formally appealed to Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman to pardon her after it paid SR7 million in blood money to the victim’s family. “The employer’s family has already pardoned the maid, thus settling the private claims,” said Rifai.
He, however, said that the public rights issue need to be settled before Satinah is finally set free.
The maid has been awaiting her death sentence since 2011 when she was found guilty of killing her employer’s 70-year-old wife and stealing SR37,970 in 2007.
The Indonesian government has fought a long battle to save the maid and had managed to get the execution delayed several times since her conviction.
Rifai said: “There are 18 workers, mainly housemaids, who have been awarded death penalty by various courts.” This includes nine female workers in the Western Province alone for their alleged involvement in various crimes.
The embassy has been trying to seek clemency in most of the cases.
In one case, according to a report published by Jakarta Post, an Indonesian daily newspaper, five Indonesian migrant workers sentenced to death in a murder case have been released by the court after receiving forgiveness from the victim’s family.
The five workers have been identified as Saiful Mubarak, Samani Muhammad, Muhammad Mursyidi, Ahmad Zizi Hartati and Abdul Aziz Supiyani. Charges against these five people were for killing a Saudi national, Zubair bin Hafiz Ghul Muhammad, in 2006.
The Indonesian diplomatic missions in Riyadh and Jeddah are still trying to resolve several cases ranging from petty crimes to death penalty matters.


Muslim World League aims to bridge gap between nations ‘through dialogue’

Al-Issa said the MWL wants to enable relief and development work in impoverished or devastated parts of the world. (SPA)
Updated 7 min 34 sec ago
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Muslim World League aims to bridge gap between nations ‘through dialogue’

  • Al-Qaeda, Daesh continue to ‘remain dangerous’
  • Al-Issa said: “The religious and cultural gap has not been addressed in many cases in the right way, producing a lack of understanding between the East and the West”

WASHINGTON: The Muslim World League (MWL) aims to foster cooperation between Muslims and followers of other faiths and to clarify concepts of Islam to non-Muslims through dialogue, said MWL Secretary-General Dr. Mohammed Al-Issa.
He expressed these views during events hosted by the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and the National Council on US-Arab Relations (NCUSAR) during a visit to Washington, DC.
The meetings were attended by the heads of both organizations, as well as a number of religious, political and intellectual figures in the US, and covered a range of topics ranging from history to current affairs.
Al-Issa also said the MWL wants to enable relief and development work in impoverished or devastated parts of the world.
He sought to allay confusion in the West about certain concepts at both meetings, including distinctions between doctrinal strictness and intellectual extremism, the concept of “jihad,” the “Ummah” (Muslim nation), the “Khilafah” (Caliphate), the meaning of “kufr” (disbelief) in Islam, the relationship between Muslims and other faiths, and whether Muslims hate Western culture. He also answered questions on the differences between Al-Qaeda and Daesh, both of which, he insisted, “remained dangerous” despite the former’s “dormancy” and the latter’s territorial losses.
Al-Issa also addressed historical discrepancies going back to the medieval period, pointing out that many Muslims in history referred to the Crusades as the “Frankish Wars,” explaining that “the term emerged at the time because Muslims were certain that true Christianity would not act as such. These campaigns had also devastated Orthodox Christian villages.”
On the historical and spiritual relationship between the East and the West, Al-Issa said: “The religious and cultural gap has not been addressed in many cases in the right way, producing a lack of understanding between the East and the West.”
He also went some way toward addressing various interpretations in Islam, including of jihad (which he said did not imply the imposition of Islam through force, but instead championed fighting injustice, aggression and persecution against fellow Muslims) and the application of the “jizyah” on non-Muslims.
He was also asked to comment on the ascent of Muslim members of the US Congress, particularly the first female members, Rep. Rashida Tlaib and Rep. Ilhan Omar during the recent midterm elections. When asked if he had any advice for the pair, Al-Issa said: “Like all other members of Congress, they must perform their national duty and remain worthy of the trust of the American people.”