10-week paid maternity leave from next year

Updated 16 September 2015
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10-week paid maternity leave from next year

JEDDAH: New changes to the country’s labor laws coming into force next year include 10 weeks fully paid maternity leave for women, beginning a maximum of four weeks before the likely date of birth.

The expected date of delivery has to be determined by a certified medical practitioner or facility, a local publication reported recently. Women would also be allowed to extend their maternity leave for an extra month without pay.
If a woman gives birth to a sick child or one with special needs that requires constant monitoring, then she would have the right to have an extra one month fully paid, with the possibility of a further one-month extension without pay.
The amendments include 15 days’ fully paid leave for non-Muslim women who are widowed. A woman worker whose husband dies may not work for another employer during this 15-day period. The employer reserves the right to request documentation in these cases.
The Ministry of Labor said these amendments also take into account the needs of men. A man is given three days paternity leave. In addition, a man who loses his wife or family member, or is marrying, is entitled to five days off with pay.
Penalties for those failing to comply include a fine of up to SR100,000, closure of the establishment for up to 30 days, or permanent closure. Penalties would increase for repeated offenses, the ministry stated.


Kingdom's anti-corruption chief leads Saudi delegation at UN General Assembly

Dr. Khalid bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Muhaisen, president of Nazaha and head of the Saudi delegation, will stress the Kingdom’s anti-corruption efforts locally and internationally. (Shutterstock)
Updated 23 May 2018
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Kingdom's anti-corruption chief leads Saudi delegation at UN General Assembly

  • The meeting will be attended by UNGA President Miroslav Lajcak, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Yuri Fedotov, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia, represented by a delegation from the National Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha), will take part on Wednesday in a high-level meeting of the UN General Assembly (UNGA) to mark 15 years since the adoption of the UN Convention against Corruption. 

The meeting will be attended by UNGA President Miroslav Lajcak, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Yuri Fedotov, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.

The opening session will discuss the most notable developments and best practices in the application of the UN Convention against Corruption, which has been adopted by 184 countries, including Saudi Arabia. The meeting will conclude with a speech by Lajcak.

Dr. Khalid bin Abdul Mohsen Al-Muhaisen, president of Nazaha and head of the Saudi delegation, will stress the Kingdom’s anti-corruption efforts locally and internationally.