Printing sector needs skilled Saudi workers

Updated 20 September 2015
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Printing sector needs skilled Saudi workers

JEDDAH: The government needs to ensure that more Saudis are trained to meet the growing demand for skilled workers in the printing sector, said members of the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI) recently.
While local printing presses are employing women to move out of the Red Zone of the Nitaqat quota system, the JCCI’s printing presses committee said there are 3,500 vacancies alone in the western region.
Investors said during the meeting that the issue of nationalizing technical jobs in the sector is the most obvious threat to their businesses. They have been able to counter this danger to some extent by hiring Saudis, especially women, in administrative jobs, and binding, accounting and marketing departments.
Investors said that they cannot find many trained Saudis for the sector because of lack of training institutions. Students do not want to study at the training facilities in Riyadh and Jeddah, they said.
Investors said the introduction of digital technology in the sector would be costly but eventually ensure higher quality and production.
Abdulaziz Al-Ghamdi, chairman of the committee, said Saudis do not want to work in the sector because they do not find it attractive. In addition, businesses pay low salaries of about SR3,000 a month. The sector did establish a training facility but Saudis did not turn up for training, he said.


KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board. (SPA)
Updated 19 February 2019
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KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

  • Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030

JEDDAH: Complaints to the Saudi National Anti-Corruption Commission, Nazaha, have risen by 50 percent in a single year amid increasing efforts to combat financial and administrative misconduct in the Kingdom.
Nazaha received 15,591 reports in 2018 compared with 10,402 the previous year, according to statistics released by the commission.
Financial and administrative corruption cases made up the bulk of the reports.
Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board and 3.37 percent to the Kingdom’s Presidency of State Security.
The commission’s smartphone app received 29 percent of the reports, followed by the website at 23.6 percent, while 19.2 percent of the complaints were made in person at Nazaha’s branches. AN Jeddah
Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030.