Shoura issued 10,000 decisions in 7,000 sessions over 88 years

Updated 24 September 2015
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Shoura issued 10,000 decisions in 7,000 sessions over 88 years

RIYADH: The Shoura Council completed its 88th year with a total of 10,000 decisions that were taken in 7,000 sessions, since King Abdul Aziz bin Abdulrahman said “We need to follow what came in the Qur’an and Sunnah in implementation of God’s orders when he said, ‘consult with them on matters’.”
The Shoura Council then had private councils and advisory commissions, in addition to consultants and consulting bodies as well as specialized committees of scholars and tribal heads.
After the first phase, the first regulatory body for the Shoura Council was set up. The council was made up of part-time members, and with the expansion of the Saudi state and the increased duties and tasks, a royal decree was issued in 1927 to form the first Shoura Council with full-time members under the presidency of the general deputy of the King and eight other members three years before unifying the Kingdom.
In 1930 the Shoura Council was reformulated in its new session which lasted until the end of 1931. In 1932 the second Shoura Council was formed and continued working for the first session and renewed its members until 1935.
In 1936 it was reformed yet another time, and it included the chairman, his deputy and his second deputy and 10 full-time members. Work continued until 1953 when it was reformed; this year is the considered as the last Shoura Council during King Abdul Aziz’s reign and this council came out with new 20 members instead of 13. Work continued with the Shoura Council as a consultative body with independent responsibility.
In 1992 King Fahd issued a new system for the Shoura Council that replaced the old system, and the council had 60 members and a president. King Fahd said the new council is a “continuation of the Islamic methodology that had been followed by King Abdulaziz, and we instill the pillars of consultations in a way that depends on clear basis.”
During the reign of King Abdullah, the council lived through a phase known as the flourishing years, with its many successes and achievements. Women entered the council and were given 30 seats and had a strong and clear representation, in addition to participating in the decision-making process inside the various executive sectors in universities, ministries, educational and government establishments, which led to setting up a culture that respects women and realizes their potential and abilities, and recognizes them as a major partners in all walks of life.
The council witnessed great growth in members during its history; in its first session it had a president and 60 members. The number grew to 90 members; the third had 120 members with various specialties and qualifications.


KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board. (SPA)
Updated 4 min 6 sec ago
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KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

  • Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030

JEDDAH: Complaints to the Saudi National Anti-Corruption Commission, Nazaha, have risen by 50 percent in a single year amid increasing efforts to combat financial and administrative misconduct in the Kingdom.
Nazaha received 15,591 reports in 2018 compared with 10,402 the previous year, according to statistics released by the commission.
Financial and administrative corruption cases made up the bulk of the reports.
Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board and 3.37 percent to the Kingdom’s Presidency of State Security.
The commission’s smartphone app received 29 percent of the reports, followed by the website at 23.6 percent, while 19.2 percent of the complaints were made in person at Nazaha’s branches. AN Jeddah
Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030.