Principals debate issues of Indian students

Updated 30 January 2013
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Principals debate issues of Indian students

The Principals Meet organized by Sign Jeddah Chapter here recently was a big success as it threw light on various issues facing Indian school students in the Kingdom.
The meet, which was first of its kind, was organized to discuss the organization’s LEAD2020 program aimed at promoting academic excellence among Indian students.
“All the participants extended their whole-hearted support to our project, which initiates combined efforts to achieve academic excellence among Indian students,” said Dr. Ismail Maritheri of King Abdulaziz University and president of Sign.
Speaking to Arab News after the meet, he said Sign aims at building up a community, which is physically and mentally healthy, where individuals are emotionally balanced, intellectually inspired, spiritually awakened, socially committed and globally competent.
“LEAD2020 is a small but significant step in this direction. We feel more confident to move ahead as result of the energy and motivation we obtained from the Principals Meet,” said Maritheri. “We expect the same support from the parent community for the successful execution of the project,” he said.
Maritheri commended Alungal Muhammad, CMD of Al-Abeer Medical Group, for his support to the project. Muhammad opened the Principals Meet and appreciated Sign’s efforts to enhance the capabilities of Indian children.
Maritheri added: “Since employers around the world are looking for competent candidates, we should make our children well-qualified by developing their skills and providing them with necessary support and training.”
The meeting discussed various aspects of modern education. Syed Masood Ahmed, principal of International Indian School Jeddah, emphasized the need for conducting more programs to develop leadership qualities among children.
Farahdunnisa, IISJ vice principal, stressed the importance of inculcating moral values among students.Speaking about the project, Maritheri said 80 talented students of Grades VI and VII will be picked for LEAD2020 after conducting special qualifying tests.
Organizers will conduct a two-hour examination in English, mathematics, general knowledge and mental ability to select the best students. In the final round of the selection process, potential candidates have to appear for a written test, group discussion and a personal interview.


World applauds as Saudi women take the wheel

A Saudi woman and her friends celebrate her first time driving on a main street of Alkhobar city in eastern Saudi Arabia on her way to Bahrain on June 24, 2018. (AFP / HUSSAIN RADWAN)
Updated 25 June 2018
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World applauds as Saudi women take the wheel

  • As the de facto ban on women driving ended after more than 60 years, women across the Kingdom flooded social media with videos of their first car trips
  • The celebrations even reached as far as France, where Aseel Al-Hamad, the first female member of the Saudi national motorsport federation, drove a Formula 1 racing car in a special parade before the French Grand Prix at Le Castellet 

JEDDAH: The world awoke on Sunday to images and video footage many thought they would never see — newly empowered Saudi women taking the wheel and driving their cars.

As the de facto ban on women driving ended after more than 60 years, women across the Kingdom flooded social media with videos of their first car trips, while some police officers among the large number out on the streets distributed roses to the first-time drivers.

The celebrations even reached as far as France, where Aseel Al-Hamad, the first female member of the Saudi national motorsport federation, drove a Formula 1 racing car in a special parade before the French Grand Prix at Le Castellet.

“I hope doing so on the day when women can drive on the roads in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia shows what you can do if you have the passion and the spirit to dream,” she said.

In a tribute to Saudi female drivers, the Lebanese soprano Hiba Tawaji released a special video of a song she performed live in Riyadh at a concert last December “Today women in Saudi Arabia can legally drive their cars,” she said. “Congratulations on this achievement, this one’s for you!”

Back home in Saudi Arabia, the atmosphere was euphoric. “It’s a beautiful day,” businesswoman Samah Algosaibi said as she cruised around the city of Alkhobar. 

“Today we are here,” she said from the driver’s seat. “Yesterday we sat there,” she said, pointing to the back.

“I feel proud, I feel dignified and I feel liberated,” said Saudi Shoura Council member Lina Almaeena, one of the first women to drive in the Kingdom.

She told Arab News that the event was changing her life by “facilitating it, making it more comfortable, making it more pleasant, and making it more stress-free.”

Almaeena urged all drivers to follow the traffic and road safety rules. “What’s making me anxious is the misconduct of a lot of the drivers, the male drivers. Unfortunately they’re not as disciplined as they should be. Simple things such as changing lanes and using your signals — this is making me anxious.

“But I’m confident: I’ve driven all around the world when I travel, especially when I’m familiar with the area. It’s really mainly how to be a defensive driver because you have to be.”