Tough security on southern border to stop intruders

Updated 01 March 2013
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Tough security on southern border to stop intruders

Saudi Arabia announced yesterday it would deport all Yemeni intruders as well as other undocumented foreigners and would ban their re-entry into the Kingdom.
“Security of the Kingdom and its citizens is a red line nobody will be allowed to violate or cross,” said Asir Gov. Prince Faisal bin Khaled, urging citizens to cooperate with security officers to flush out illegals.
Maj. Gen. Mansour Al-Turki, spokesman of the Interior Ministry, said border guards prevented more than 1,000 intruders from entering the Kingdom through the southern border. “An average of 180 intruders are arrested in the Asir region alone,” he said.
He said a high-level security committee has been formed to deal with the issue of intruders, on the directive of Interior Minister Prince Muhammad bin Naif. “The committee began its mission today,” the spokesman said, adding that it reviewed the security situation in the region. The committee is in contact with security leaders in the region to monitor latest developments.
“Security presence along the border has been intensified to prevent intruders. But there are some difficult terrains which people use to enter the Kingdom illegally.” Al-Turki urged Saudis to inform police about illegal residents and those who assist and transport intruders.
The Passport Department said they have deported about 575,000 illegals last year, mostly Yemenis after conducting nationwide campaigns to track them down.


Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

Updated 25 April 2018
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Green light for crown prince-led Saudi privatization program

  • The Privatization Program is one of 12 key elements of the Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030
  • The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s Council of Economic and Development Affairs on Tuesday approved the Privatization Program that is one of 12 key elements of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030. 

The program is aimed at increasing job opportunities for Saudi nationals, attracting the latest technologies and innovations, and supporting economic development.

It encourages both local and foreign investment in order to enhance the role of the private sector, with government entities adopting a regulatory and supervisory role. The aim is to increase the private sector’s contribution to GDP from 40 percent to 65 percent by 2030. 

The program will aim to reach its objectives through encouraging the private sector to invest in establishing new schools, universities and health centers, while the government pursues its organizational and supervisory role in health and education.

The privatization program aims to benefit from previous success stories, with the private sector’s collaboration in the development of infrastructure, and its involvement on a large scale in sectors such as energy, water, transport, telecommunications, petrochemicals and finance.

The program sets out a series of objectives in three areas: Developing a general legal framework for policies related to privatization; establishing organizational foundations and dedicated institutions to execute the policies; and setting a timescale for their delivery. 

The Council of Economic and Development Affairs is headed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.