Universities commended for their role in heritage education

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Updated 17 December 2012
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Universities commended for their role in heritage education

Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities, has commended Saudi universities for their role in heritage education.
“All innovative projects presented by university students have won awards. This shows the Kingdom’s high potential of urban heritage development,” he said while addressing a ceremony for the distribution of Sultan bin Salman Urban Heritage Award.
The ceremony was organized by Turath charity association in cooperation with Dammam University, featured in the Second Urban Heritage Forum held under the aegis of Eastern Province Gov. Prince Muhammad bin Fahd.
The SCTA president thanked Prince Muhammad for attending the ceremony that reflected “his concern for national heritage in general and the urban heritage in particular, and his support for the heritage preservation.”
Prince Sultan, who is also president of Turath and head of the award’s supreme committee, said this year, the committee had noticed a substantial increase in participation and attendance thanks to the efforts exerted by the award’s patron and organizers.
Abdullah bin Muhammad Al-Rubaish, president of Dammam University, commended Prince Sultan’s keenness to preserve the Kingdom’s heritage. “This award bespeaks Prince Sultan’s concern for preserving urban heritage as an outstanding feature of our national identity and Islamic Arab civilization.”
Usamah bin Usamah Al-Guhari, general-secretary of Turath, noted the importance of the award due to its deep civilizational and historical interests. He thanked the SCTA for its interest in urban heritage development.
During the ceremony, Prince Sultan declared the acceptance by Crown Prince Salman, deputy premier and minister of defense, of the Sultan bin Salman Urban Heritage Award for his lifetime achievement.
“The lifetime achievement award has been honored by acceptance of Prince Salman,” the SCTA chief said, and thanked the crown prince for his efforts in developing urban heritage sites in Riyadh during the past 50 years.
“Prince Salman’s concern for the promotion of urban heritage wasn’t limited to Riyadh, but it was nationwide and gained international applause. That reflects his pride of the Islamic Arab civilization and the depth of its influence and importance of its cultural, social and economic dimensions.”
The crown prince will receive the Prince Sultan Lifetime Award during a ceremony at the Riyadh National Museum on Dec. 18. The Urban Heritage Preservation Award went to Al-Hafuf’s Beit Al-Baia’s preservation project and Al-Namas heritage village restoration project. The Human Dimension Award was won by Hufouf development project of Al-Ahsa municipality, while the Economic Heritage Project Award went to Tarut heritage compound project, Al-Qateef municipality, and Al-Jazeera association.
The Urban Heritage Research Award went to a research on benefiting from artistic heritage of Dhi-Ain village for developing and reviving traditional handicrafts by Al-Sayed Saleh bin Abdul Allah Saleh Al Zahrani.
Meanwhile, a Chinese delegation recently visited Masmak Museum in Riyadh. Nasser Al-Oraifi, director of the museum briefed the delegates about its content and the role played by King Abdul Aziz to unify the Kingdom.


Saudi businesswomen eye greater role in the economy with end to driving ban

The end of the driving ban is expected to help bring an economic windfall for Saudi women. (Shutterstock)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Saudi businesswomen eye greater role in the economy with end to driving ban

  • The historic move is a huge step forward for businesswomen in the Saudi Arabia, says businesswoman
  • A recent survey by the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce indicated that transportation was a major concern holding Saudi women back from joining the labor market

The end of the driving ban will boost women’s financial power and allow them to play a bigger role in economic and social diversification in line with Vision 2030, prominent businesswomen said on Friday.

Hind Khalid Al-Zahid was the first Saudi woman designated as an executive director — for Dammam Airport Company — and also heads the Businesswomen Center at the Eastern Province Chamber of Commerce and Industry. 

She sees the historic move as a huge step forward for businesswomen in the Kingdom.

“Women being allowed to drive is very important; of course this will help a lot in sustainable development as the lifting of the ban on women driving came as a wonderful opportunity to increase women’s participation in the workforce,” she told Arab News on Friday, ahead of the end of the ban on Sunday.

She added that women in the job market are under-represented; they make up to 22 percent of the national workforce of about six million according to official estimates. Lifting the ban will help to take women’s representation in the workforce to 30 percent by 2030, she said.

“This is not just the right thing to do for women’s emancipation, but also an essential step in economic and social development as part of the reforms,” she said.

She said that there were different obstacles in increasing women’s participation in the workforce and other productive activities, and the driving ban was one of them. It was a strategic issue that needed to be addressed on a priority basis. With the issue resolved, it would help immensely in giving Saudi women better representation as they would help to diversify the Saudi economy and society.

She said that women could contribute hugely to the workforce and labor market as half of Saudi human resources were female, and unless allowed to excel in different sectors it would not be possible to do better, mainly because of restricted mobility.

A recent survey by the Jeddah Chamber of Commerce indicated that transportation was a major concern holding Saudi women back from joining the labor market.

Nouf Ibrahim, a businesswoman in Riyadh, said: “It will surely boost female economic participation and help increase women’s representation in the workforce immensely. It will also help to reduce the overall national unemployment rate as most of the unemployed are women and many of them are eligible as university graduates.”

She echoed the opinion that the move would help to bring an economic windfall for Saudi women, making it easier for them to work and do business, and thus play a bigger and better role that would help economic and social diversification in line with Saudi Vision 2030.

“Being able to drive from Sunday onwards after the ban is lifted will be a wonderful experience. Earlier we were dependent on a male family member and house driver to take us to workplace, to the shopping center, school or other required places for some work, now we can drive and that will allow active participation in productive work,” Sulafa Hakami, a Saudi woman working as the digital communication manager with an American MNC in Riyadh, told Arab News.

“Saudi women can now share effectively the bigger and better responsibilities,” she said.