Saudi author’s book nominated for UAE award

Updated 20 December 2012
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Saudi author’s book nominated for UAE award

Abdul Aziz Al-Dakheel’s book “Al Tanmiya Al Iqtisadiyya” (Economic development in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia) has been long-listed as one of the best contributions to the development of nations for the Sheikh Zayed Book Award. The award is an independent cultural recognition that the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority gives in memory of the ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of UAE, the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al-Nahyan. It is presented every year to outstanding Arab writers, intellectuals, publishers and young emerging talents whose writings and translations of humanities have scholarly and objective appeal that have enriched the cultural, literary and social life of the Arab world.
A reading panel for the award nominated Al-Dakheel’s scholarly contribution along with nine other works that were selected among a total of 1,262 books spanning categories in the fields of economics, sociology, management, politics, law and theology.
Last year, the award for the best contribution to the development of nations was withheld. Nominations did not meet the standards of the Scientific Committee that evaluates and judges the selected works. This year’s long-listed authors are from Syria, Egypt, Bahrain, Lebanon, Iraq, Morocco and Saudi Arabia. Their books will undergo a stringent process before the results are announced. The shortlist will be announced in February and a special felicitation ceremony will be held early next year at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions on March 25 to announce the winner.
The award comprises of a total monetary prize value standing at 7 million UAE dirham (SR 7.15 million) for winners in different categories. The Cultural Personality of the Year will receive a prize of one million dirham (over SR 1 million).


Massive diamond cache detected beneath Earth’s surface

Updated 18 July 2018
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Massive diamond cache detected beneath Earth’s surface

  • “This shows that diamond is not perhaps this exotic mineral..."
  • These naturally occurring precious minerals are located far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached

WASHINGTON: There’s a load of bling buried in the Earth.
More than a quadrillion tons of diamonds to be exact — or one thousand times more than one trillion — US researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported this week.
But don’t expect a diamond rush. These naturally occurring precious minerals are located far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached, about 90 to 150 miles (145 to 240 kilometers) below the surface of our planet.
“We can’t get at them, but still, there is much more diamond there than we have ever thought before,” said Ulrich Faul, a research scientist in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.
“This shows that diamond is not perhaps this exotic mineral, but on the scale of things, it’s relatively common.”
Using seismic technology to analyze how sound waves pass through the Earth, scientists detected the treasure trove in rocks called cratonic roots, which are shaped like inverted mountains that stretch through the Earth’s crust and into the mantle.
These are “the oldest and most immovable sections of rock that lie beneath the center of most continental tectonic plates,” explained MIT in a statement.
The project to uncover deep Earth diamonds began because scientists were puzzled by observations that sound waves would speed up significantly when passing through the roots of ancient cratons.
So they assembled virtual rocks, made from various combinations of minerals, to calculate how fast sound waves would travel through them.
“Diamond in many ways is special,” Faul said.
“One of its special properties is, the sound velocity in diamond is more than twice as fast as in the dominant mineral in upper mantle rocks, olivine.”
They found that the only type of rock that matched the speeds they were detecting in craton would contain one to two percent diamond.
Scientists now believe the Earth’s ancient underground rocks contain at least 1,000 times more diamond than previously expected.
Still, very few of these gems are expected to make their way to the jewelry store.
Diamonds are made from carbon, and are formed under high-pressure and extreme temperatures deep in the Earth.
They emerge near the surface only through volcanic eruptions that occur rarely — on the order of every few tens of millions of years.