Huawei reveals ‘fastest smartphone in the world’

Updated 03 March 2013
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Huawei reveals ‘fastest smartphone in the world’

BARCELONA, Spain: Huawei, a Chinese company that recently became the world’s third-largest maker of smartphones, calls its new flagship product “the fastest smartphone in the world” and wants to use it to expand global awareness of its brand.
Parts of the presentation of the phone at a press conference Sunday in Barcelona, Spain, suggest that the company has some way to go in polishing its pitch for a global audience.
Richard Yu, head of Huawei’s consumer business group said the new phone can be programmed to display more than 100 different “themes,” or looks. This is important because “ladies like flowers, colorful things,” Yu said.
Yu also said Huawei is learning from Apple how to make Google’s Android software easier to use, a lawsuit-friendly utterance considering that Apple is on a global campaign to sue makers of Android phones for copying from the iPhone.
The new phone, the Ascend P2, will have a 4.7 inch screen. Yu said it will be available in the April to June time frame for about $525 without a contract. It’s the “fastest” because it supports faster download speeds than other phones. However, today’s wireless networks aren’t equipped to supply those speeds.
Huawei Technologies Ltd. was the world’s third largest seller of smartphones, after Samsung and Apple, in the fourth quarter of last year, according to research firm IDC. That’s despite selling very few phones in the US, where the big phone companies mostly ignore it. It has a much better position in Europe, where cellphone companies have embraced its network equipment, and France’s Orange is committed to selling the phone.
In the US, a congressional panel recommended in October that phone carriers avoid doing business with Huawei or its smaller Chinese rival, ZTE Corp., for fear that its network equipment could contain “back doors” that enable access to communications from outside. The Chinese government rejected the report as false and an effort to block Chinese companies from the US market.
Meanwhile, a report by a private US cybersecurity firm concluded recently that a special unit of China’s military is responsible for sustained cyberespionage against US companies and government agencies. China has denied involvement in the attacks in which massive amounts of data and corporate trade secrets, likely worth hundreds of millions of dollars, were stolen.
“It has not been an easy journey for us,” Huawei’s global brand director, Amy Lou, said Sunday of the company’s quest to become globally recognized and trusted. She called the company “a great consumer brand in the making.”
The world’s largest cellphone trade show, Mobile World Congress, opens Monday in Barcelona.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.