‘Reserveout’ changes the way you dine

Updated 06 December 2014
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‘Reserveout’ changes the way you dine

Wondering where to go out on a Thursday night? Wish you could know what restaurants are close to you or which are within your budget? Check out Reserveout app (they also have a Website).
Download Reservout for iPhone or Android to start using the app.
Once you open the app for the first time, Reserveout will ask you to turn on location services but you don’t have to do that. An overlay will appear and you will get to choose your city from the list: Amman, Beirut, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Manama and Doha. After that, filter restaurants by choosing your favorite cuisine or the one you would like to try from Reserveout’s list: Jordanian, Italian, Mediterranean, Lebanese, Seafood, Asian and American or by Neighborhood (area) or price range.
You can alternatively sort the results by distance, name or price.
For each restaurant listed by Reserveout, you will be able to see a description of the place by the owner which often includes the atmosphere and menu. Other details provided are working hours, cuisines, dress code, price and address.
Reserveout offers you four great features through its app:
1. Reserve online: you can make an online reservation for a month in advance for up to 18 people as well as find a table in the restaurant. To complete your reservation, you need to sign in. Your host will call you within 24 hours to confirm your reservation.
Make sure you choose a non-smoking table!
2. View location: Even if your location services are off you can still view a map for directions to the restaurant. Which is useful when you’re phone battery is low.
3. Promotions: Know about the latest promotions in town. For those who plan their outings; you can view promotions based on the day too.
4. Events: Reserveout has prepared a calendar of events taking place in restaurants around your city.
I’m not sure how effective are the reservations system but Reserveout seems to be useful when you don’t know where to dine especially if you’re on a budget or have a big event to celebrate. Download the app and let us know what you think.


EU adopts powers to respond to cyberattacks

Updated 17 May 2019
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EU adopts powers to respond to cyberattacks

  • The EU can now impose asset freezes and travel bans on individuals, firms and state bodies implicated in cyberattacks
  • Sanctions will be considered if a cyberattack is determined to have had a ‘significant impact’ on its target

BRUSSELS: The European Union on Friday adopted powers to punish those outside the bloc who launch cyberattacks that cripple hospitals and banks, sway elections and steal company secrets or funds.
EU ministers meeting in Brussels said the 28-nation group would now, for the first time, be able to impose asset freezes and travel bans on individuals, firms and state bodies implicated in such attacks.
“The Council (of EU countries) established a framework which allows the EU to impose targeted restrictive measures to deter and respond to cyberattacks,” it said in a statement.
It added that sanctions will be considered if a cyberattack is determined to have had a “significant impact” on its target.
The goal is to bolster the security of EU institutions, firms and individuals against what Britain called an increase in the “scale and severity” of cyberattacks globally.
“This is decisive action to deter future cyberattacks,” British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said after Britain and its EU partners drafted the measures.
“For too long now, hostile actors have been threatening the EU’s security through disrupting critical infrastructure, attempts to undermine democracy and stealing commercial secrets and money running to billions of euros,” Hunt said.
“Our message to governments, regimes and criminal gangs prepared to carry out cyberattacks is clear,” Britain’s top diplomat added.
“Together, the international community will take all necessary steps to uphold the rule of law and the rules based international system which keeps our societies safe.”
The British government has pledged to continue close cooperation with the EU after it leaves the bloc in line with the 2016 referendum.
Under the sanctions regime, diplomats said, the 28 EU countries would have to vote unanimously to impose sanctions after meeting a legal threshold of significant impact.
For example, countries would look at the scope and severity of disruption to economic and other activities, essential services, critical state functions, public order or public safety, diplomats said.
They would examine the number of people and EU countries affected and determine how much money, intellectual property and data have been stolen.
EU diplomats told reporters it could also cover the hacking of European elections by a third party or country. Elections for a new European Parliament take place May 23-26.
In line with US intelligence assessments, EU officials highlight in particular the threat of disinformation and election hacking from Russia.
EU countries would also study how much the perpetrator has gained through such action.
A Dutch diplomat told reporters that the powers amount to a “big step forward” toward building a more secure cyberspace.
European leaders in October had called for a regime to impose sanctions against cyberattacks.
US and European police said Thursday they have smashed a huge international cybercrime network that used Russian malware to steal 100 million dollars from tens of thousands of victims worldwide.
EU diplomats said the bloc will now start drawing up a blacklist for potential sanctions in cyberattack cases.
A number of powerful people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin appear on a blacklist of 164 Russians and Ukrainians that was established after Moscow’s annexation of the Crimean peninsula in 2014.
Those blacklisted are under travel bans and asset freezes just like those that would be imposed on those implicated in cyberattacks.