How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification

Updated 17 January 2015
0

How wearable biometric devices are changing individual identification

What exactly are “wearables” and why are they becoming so popular? Wearable biometric devices refer to electronic physiologic tracking technology incorporated into items of clothing and/or accessories that can read, record, and store individual biometric traits such as your heart rate, blood pressure, calorie intake, monitoring sleep, measuring steps, or charting any type of physical activity, and most wearables communicate data through wireless Wi-Fi or near field communication (NFC) technology. The future of individual identification in consumer based industries will be led by the integration of wearable technology with authentication and identification in both physical and virtual environments. Examples of potential wearable devices that could be included in this integration are smart watches, bands, ear-pods, jewelry, eyeglasses, contact lenses and clothing.
Many wearable devices now include biometric identification capabilities and have the potential to influence how we identify ourselves in the fields of health and medicine, fitness, education, transportation, finance, gaming, and music.
The burgeoning field of biometric identification uses physiological features such as fingerprints, finger vein and palm vein patterns, as well as iris and facial recognition to verify individual identities by comparing a live person’s biological credentials with a previously stored biometric template. Biometrics are used as a high level identification mechanism offering strong security in many government and commercial settings including border control, voter registration, public safety, workforce management, financial services, and more. There are many types of wearable biometric devices used in different industries in different scenarios, each of them playing a vital role to bring security and convenience to consumers. Here are some top wearable devices with biometric identification capabilities that are used in industries for various purposes:
Google Glass: Google Glass is a wearable technology with an optical head-mounted display (OHMD). This wearable device is compatible with voice and facial recognition and has the capability to perform individual identification. Google glass opened a new era of reliable identification methods for law enforcement agencies to identify criminals, banks to verify customers, and in health care for accurate patient identification.
The applications of Google Glass for identification are far reaching. For example, Dubai police will soon use Google Glass for field operation purposes with a custom-developed facial recognition software platform. Dubai police will now be able to capture photos of people around them and search their faces in a database of people wanted for crimes.
According to the Financial Times, a number of banks, including Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Ukraine’s PrivatBank, are developing so-called augmented reality apps to use with Google Glass to verify customers with added information about their physical surroundings in real time using voice and facial recognition.
Smart watches: ”Smart watches” are getting smarter, containing operating systems that can now perform multiple tasks such as calculations, translations, functioning as media player, making or answering phone calls, and a host of other functions that extend their utility far beyond keeping time. On the horizon are smart watches with biometric authentication capabilities that promise to accelerate their adoption for individual identification.
Samsung Electronics, together with global financial transaction service PayPal, is preparing to install a mobile payment function into smart watches by using a biometric identification sensor including fingerprint verification that will enable end users to quickly sign into PayPal and easily make secure mobile payments. This would increase the ability to simplify payment authentication on a device with limited space for a long PIN or password that will lead the retail industry to adopt wearable biometric devices for individual identification in payment systems.
Wristbands: Wristbands are very comfortable to use and now offer end users — biometric authentication capabilities using their heart rate, blood pressure, or body temperature. These types of wristbands are capable of individual identification for different purposes such as health care for patient identification and monitoring, financial services for customer and employee identification, in retail for fast transactions, and for use in the ”Internet of Things” for virtual authentication. The Royal bank of Canada is trialing lower risk biometric banking payments using a wearable biometric wristband device for customer identification with the tap of a wrist at the point of sale.
Wearable biometric devices connected with smartphones or computers using wireless Bluetooth, WI-FI, or NFC bring a convenient way to identify individuals in different industries. Healthcare, banking/financial services, and the Internet of Things are examples of settings that stand to see huge benefits in different identification scenarios such as patient identification, mobile payments, banking transactions, employee identification, digital authentication, and more. Here are some key benefit of using wearables for individual identification:
Accurate Identification: Wearable biometric devices help perform accurate identification when speed and higher accuracy are needed. Industries such as health care, banking, and retail can benefit using this technology for convenient transactions and access control authentication.
Fast, Accurate Retail Payment Identification: Wearable biometric devices allow end users to quickly pay for point of sale and online goods and services. Payment services like AliPay, Apple Pay, and PayPal are planning to move from smart mobile devices to wearable devices to offer convenient, biometrically-authenticated payments.
Increase Productivity and Accountability in Workforce Management: Enterprises can use wearable biometric devices to identify employees for access control purposes, to record time and attendance, and automatically allow access to sensitive information. This can help businesses to increase productivity and accountability and implement secure access control systems.
Unique Security Features: Consumers are concerned about security when using mobile based payments. Wearable biometric devices provide unique and secure identification features that increases faith and trust among consumers to engage in mobile transactions.

Author bio: Arifin Hussain is the SEO Specialist with M2SYS Technology, an award-winning industry leader in biometric identity management technology.


NASA probe detects likely ‘marsquake’ — an interplanetary first

A life-size model of the spaceship Insight, NASA's first robotic lander dedicated to studying the deep interior of Mars, is shown at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, U.S. November 26, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 24 April 2019
0

NASA probe detects likely ‘marsquake’ — an interplanetary first

  • A more distant quake would yield greater information about Mars’ interior because seismic waves would “penetrate deeper into the planet before they come back up to the seismometer,” he said

CALIFORNIA: NASA’s robotic probe InSight has detected and measured what scientists believe to be a “marsquake,” marking the first time a likely seismological tremor has been recorded on another planet, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California reported on Tuesday.
The breakthrough came nearly five months after InSight, the first spacecraft designed specifically to study the deep interior of a distant world, touched down on the surface of Mars to begin its two-year seismological mission on the red planet.
The faint rumble characterized by JPL scientists as a likely marsquake, roughly equal to a 2.5 magnitude earthquake, was recorded on April 6 — the lander’s 128th Martian day, or sol.
It was detected by InSight’s French-built seismometer, an instrument sensitive enough to measure a seismic wave just one-half the radius of a hydrogen atom.
“We’ve been collecting background noise up until now, but this first event officially kicks off a new field: Martian seismology,” InSight principal investigator Bruce Banerdt said in a news release.
Scientists are still examining the data to conclusively determine the precise cause of the signal, but the trembling appeared to have originated from inside the planet, as opposed to being caused by forces above the surface, such as wind.
“The high frequency level and broad band is very similar to what we get from a rupture process. So we are very confident that this is a marsquake,” Philippe Lognonné, a geophysics and planetary science professor at University Paris Diderot in France and lead researcher for InSight’s seismometer, said in an email.
Still, a tremor so faint in Southern California would be virtually lost among the dozens of small seismic crackles that occur there every day.
“Our informed guesswork is that this a very small event that’s relatively close, maybe from 50 to 100 kilometers away” from the lander, Banerdt told Reuters by telephone.
A more distant quake would yield greater information about Mars’ interior because seismic waves would “penetrate deeper into the planet before they come back up to the seismometer,” he said.
 
The size and duration of the marsquake also fit the profile of some of the thousands of moonquakes detected on the lunar surface between 1969 and 1977 by seismometers installed there by NASA’s Apollo missions, said Lori Glaze, planetary science division director at NASA headquarters in Washington.
The lunar and Martian surfaces are extremely quiet compared with Earth, which experiences constant low-level seismic noise from oceans and weather as well as quakes that occur along subterranean fault lines created by shifting tectonic plates in the planet’s crust.
Mars and the moon lack tectonic plates. Their seismic activity is instead driven by a cooling and contracting process that causes stress to build up and become strong enough to rupture the crust.
Three other apparent seismic signals were picked up by InSight on March 14, April 10 and April 11 but were even smaller and more ambiguous in origin, leaving scientists less certain they were actual marsquakes.
Lognonné said he expected InSight to eventually detect quakes 50 to 100 times larger than the April 6 tremor.