Social media usage in the Middle East

Updated 29 February 2016

Social media usage in the Middle East

Damian Radcliffe, a journalism professor at the University of Oregon, issued his fourth annual report titled “The story of 2015” discussing the social media in the Middle East.

As expected, the region is scoring high penetration rates in social media. According to the report, there are more than 41 million active users in the region. Needless to say, the young, tech-savvy generation available in the region is the main reason driving these high rates of social media consumption.
Although the whole region is witnessing a boom in the new media usage, there are still some differences in the platforms’ preferences and usage across the Middle East, especially between the Gulf countries and North Africa.
For instance, the leading platform in Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, and Lebanon is none other than the messaging service WhatsApp.
In percentage, WhatsApp is used by more than 94 percent of the social media active users in the Kingdom, while used by virtually all those active on social media in the UAE. In general, 41 percent of the social media users in the region are using WhatsApp.
However, the platform that is leading the race in the region as a whole is Facebook. Egypt constitutes the largest fan-base of the platform at 27 million active users, while there are 12 million users in Saudi Arabia, and 11 million in Iraq. In the region as a whole, 87 percent of the social media active users have a presence on Facebook, with 84 percent of them accessing the platform from their mobile devices, and 89 percent of them on a daily basis.
When it comes to Twitter, Saudi Arabia and UAE are on top with 53 percent and 51 percent active users in these countries, respectively, using the platform. The lowest usage across the region comes in Libya and Syria, with 12 percent and 14 percent respectively. Interestingly, the study states that 45 percent of those using Twitter age between 18 and 24, while 25 percent only of them are aged 45 or above. However, it is good to notice that Saudi Arabia is having the largest number of users of the platform, it is scoring low in daily usage, which could hint that Saudis are moving away from the platform toward its competitors like Instagram and Snapchat.
Snapchat has recorded the highest annual growth, jumping from 3 percent to 12 percent in the region. The live stories the platform features on Makkah, Riyadh and Dubai secured its popularity in the region and turned it into a new platform of choice for many social media influencers.
The rest of the report discusses the behavior of the region’s consumers in the field of entrainment and news consumption, shedding more light and emphasizing on the fact that social media platforms became a very important and sometimes sensitive areas of interest in any attempt to analyze and understand the region.


“Punch in the gut” as scientists find micro plastic in Arctic ice

Chief Scientist for the Northwest Passage Project Dr. Brice Loose drills an ice core in the Arctic as part of an 18-day icebreaker expedition that took place in July and August 2019 in the Northwest Passage, in a still image taken from a handout video obtained by REUTERS on August 14, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 15 August 2019

“Punch in the gut” as scientists find micro plastic in Arctic ice

  • The researchers said the ice they sampled appeared to be at least a year old and had probably drifted into Lancaster Sound from more central regions of the Arctic

LONDON: Tiny pieces of plastic have been found in ice cores drilled in the Arctic by a US-led team of scientists, underscoring the threat the growing form of pollution now poses to marine life in even the remotest waters on the planet.
The researchers used a helicopter to land on ice floes and retrieve the samples during an 18-day icebreaker expedition through the Northwest Passage, the hazardous route linking the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.
“We had spent weeks looking out at what looks so much like pristine white sea ice floating out on the ocean,” said Jacob Strock, a graduate student researcher at the University of Rhode Island, who conducted an initial onboard analysis of the cores.
“When we look at it up close and we see that it’s all very, very visibly contaminated when you look at it with the right tools — it felt a little bit like a punch in the gut,” Strock told Reuters by telephone.
Strock and his colleagues found the material trapped in ice taken from Lancaster Sound, an isolated stretch of water in the Canadian Arctic, which they had assumed might be relatively sheltered from drifting plastic pollution
The team drew 18 ice cores of up to two meters in length from four locations, and saw visible plastic beads and filaments of various shapes and sizes. The scientists said the findings reinforce the observation that micro plastic pollution appears to concentrate in ice relative to seawater.
“The plastic just jumped out in both its abundance and its scale,” said Brice Loose, an oceanographer at the University of Rhode Island and chief scientist of the expedition, known as the Northwest Passage Project.
The scientists’ dismay is reminiscent of the consternation felt by explorers who found plastic waste in the Pacific Ocean’s Marianas Trench, the deepest place on Earth, during submarine dives earlier this year.
The Northwest Passage Project is primarily focused on investigating the impact of manmade climate change on the Arctic, whose role as the planet’s cooling system is being compromised by the rapid vanishing of summer sea ice.
But the plastic fragments — known as micro plastic — also served to highlight how the waste problem has reached epidemic proportions. The United Nations estimates that 100 million tons of plastic have been dumped in the oceans to date.
The researchers said the ice they sampled appeared to be at least a year old and had probably drifted into Lancaster Sound from more central regions of the Arctic.
The team plans to subject the plastic they retrieved to further analysis to support a broader research effort to understand the damage plastic is doing to fish, seabirds and large ocean mammals such as whales.
Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Heising-Simons Foundation in the United States, the expedition in the Swedish icebreaker The Oden ran from July 18 to Aug. 4 and covered some 2,000 nautical miles.