South Sudan arrests 2 state TV journalists

Updated 07 January 2013
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South Sudan arrests 2 state TV journalists

NAIROBI, Kenya: A journalists group says two reporters working for state TV in South Sudan have been arrested without charge.
The Committee to Protect Journalists says the journalists were arrested following protests and ethnic clashes last month in the northwestern town of Wau that killed about a dozen people. Video of one clash showed police opening fire on protesters.
The New York-based CPJ says Louis Pasquale and Ashab Khamis are being held in prison. Three other state journalists were arrested and released, it said.
CPJ said local journalists suspect the arrests are in retaliation for the video being passed on to international media outlets. South Sudan’s information minister didn’t answer calls seeking comment yesterday.


Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

Updated 10 min 17 sec ago
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Houthi militias use children to plant mines in liberated areas: minister

  • Yemen’s minister of human rights revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from.
  • Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.

LONDON: Yemen’s minister of human rights Dr. Mohammed Askar revealed that Houthi militias backed by Iran are using children to plant mines in areas that they are being expelled from. He also said that they are planting bombs in houses, hospitals, and places of worship, threatening civilians.
Askar explained that Houthi militias used different types of mines, including anti-personnel mines which are banned in residential areas and are very dangerous, and camouflaged and improvised mines.
The Houthi militias have also invented new ways of using anti-vehicle mines and transforming them so that they can be used as anti-personnel mines with the intention of killing and injuring as many people as possible.
He added that Houthi militias have exploited the difficult economic and social conditions and the complex tribal nature of Yemen to attract and recruit children.
Many families send their children to join the Houthis in exchange for 50,000 Yemeni riyals ($150) in order to fulfil their daily needs, especially in large families.
Houthis are also carrying out campaigns to religiously mobilize children in Saudi where students are given weekly lessons on the benefits of war.