Hossa scores in OT as Blackhawks run streak to 19 games

Updated 26 February 2013
0

Hossa scores in OT as Blackhawks run streak to 19 games

CHICAGO: Marian Hossa scored 1:44 into overtime and the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-2 on Monday night to stretch their NHL-record opening points streak to 19 games.
Patrick Sharp set up the winning goal with a quick turn along the boards and a drive to the goal that led to two stops by Nikolai Khabibulin. Hossa picked up the second rebound and was again stuffed by Khabibulin before he poked it in for his ninth goal of the season.
Patrick Kane and Viktor Stalberg also scored for Chicago (16-0-3), which has won six straight and nine of 10. Ray Emery made 17 saves to remain unbeaten in eight starts this season.
Nail Yakupov and Jeff Petry had the goals for Edmonton, which carried a 2-1 lead into the third period but couldn’t hold on for its fourth consecutive victory over the Blackhawks. Khabibulin had 31 stops in the opener of the Oilers’ franchise-record, nine-game road trip.
Kings 5 Ducks 2: In Los Angeles, Slava Voynov scored the go-ahead goal in the third period and Los Angeles beat Anaheim for its fourth consecutive victory while snapping the Ducks’ six-game winning streak.
Dustin Brown added a goal and his 200th career assist, and Anze Kopitar had three assists to help the Kings win for the sixth time in seven games. Jonathan Quick stopped 24 shots.
Anaheim’s 30-year-old rookie, Viktor Fasth, made 20 saves in the loss after winning his first eight NHL games, the longest streak in the league this season.
Jake Muzzin, Jeff Carter and Dustin Penner also scored for the Kings.
Andrew Cogliano and Saku Koivu scored for the Ducks.
Senators 2 Canadiens 1, SO: In Ottawa, Peter Regin scored in the fifth round of the shootout and Ben Bishop made 44 saves in regulation and overtime, leading Ottawa to a win over Montreal.
Jakob Silfverberg also scored in the shootout, while David Desharnais replied for Montreal.
After Regin gave the Senators the lead in the shootout, Bishop stopped Tomas Plekanec to secure Ottawa’s season-high fifth straight win. Regin had a chance to end the game late in OT but his slap shot hit the post behind Canadiens goaltender Carey Price, who finished with 23 saves. Dave Dziurzynski had a goal in regulation for the Senators.
Andrei Markov scored for the Canadiens.
Maple Leafs 4 Flyers 2: In Philadelphia, Phil Kessel, Nikolai Kulemin, Mikhail Grabovski and Jay McClement scored to lead Toronto to a win over Philadelphia.
Ben Scrivens made 23 saves for Toronto, which survived a double-minor against leading scorer James van Riemsdyk in the third period. Van Riemsdyk, who was drafted with the second overall pick in the 2007 draft by the Flyers and played three seasons with them before being traded, was held scoreless in his return to Philadelphia.
Scott Hartnell scored his first goal of the season for the Flyers, who had won three of their last four. Jakub Voracek also scored for Philadelphia.
Predators 5 Stars 4, OT: In Nashville, Tennessee, Roman Josi scored his second goal 28 seconds into overtime and Nashville edged Dallas in a game featuring six goals scored in the second period.
Josi’s slap shot helped Nashville end a two-game skid, and the defenseman also had two assists.
Mike Fisher, Craig Smith and Patric Hornqvist each scored goals for Nashville. The last two losses had been shutouts, and the Predators ended a scoring drought at 133:43 after threatening the franchise-worst drought that reached 176:18 on Feb. 13 in an overtime win over San Jose.

Rookie Matt Fraser and Reilly Smith scored 25 seconds apart within the first 2 minutes of the second, and Vern Fiddler and Eriksson added a power-play goal apiece in the second period.


Mohamed Salah’s brilliance and impact better seen off-pitch than on it

Updated 26 April 2018
0

Mohamed Salah’s brilliance and impact better seen off-pitch than on it

  • Jurgen Klopp praises the positive impact Mohamed Salah has had on attitudes towards Islam and the Arab World
  • Salah has 43 goals in all competitions this season and is a serious Ballon d'Or contender

LONDON: “Mohamed Salah is the best footballer in the world at the moment,” “Salah is up there with Messi and Ronaldo,” “Salah has the world at
his feet...”
In a world ever more prone to hyperbole and after yet another masterclass from the Egyptian ace, it is not surprising that such grandiose statements get bandied about with the regularity of a Salah goal. The 25-year-old was simply sublime during Liverpool’s 5-2 destruction of Roma on Tuesday night.
He has now scored 43 times this season, has a genuine chance of winning the Ballon d’Or, and with every match looks more deserving of the superstar mantle his admirers have given him.
But while we can sit back and marvel at his talent, all those tributes are perhaps missing the point. We can debate whether he is a world-beater on the pitch, but what is not in doubt is that Salah is a game-changer off it — and that is the true mark of just how impressive he has been since moving to Liverpool.
Go to Anfield for any match now and, once the rousing rendition of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” has died down, it is likely you will next hear the Liverpool fans’ hymn to Salah. Sung to the tune of “Good Enough” by Britpop band Dodgy, it goes like this: “If he’s good enough for you, he’s good enough for me, if he scores another few, then I’ll be a Muslim, too.” Such is the “Salah effect.”
Britain is a hugely fractured country at the moment. The Brexit vote and debate surrounding it has held up a mirror to an island ill at ease with itself, with regressive attitudes to race, religion and immigration out in the open.
That Salah has been welcomed with open arms and lauded in that climate — albeit in a city with a proud tradition of tolerance — is quite something, not least at a time when Islamaphobic attacks in the UK are on the rise and when, as recently as 2016, a national newspaper ran a headline that claimed “1 in 5 Brit Muslims’ sympathy for jihadis.”
The context of the Salah worship evident not just in Liverpool, but also around the country has not been lost on his manager, Jurgen Klopp.
“(The hero status of Salah) is fantastic. It’s exactly what we need in these times,” the German told Channel 4 News.
“To see this wonderful young man, full of joy, full of love, full of friendship, full of everything, in a world where we all struggle a little bit to understand all the things happening around on this planet — so it’s just fantastic.
“He is a Muslim and he is doing all the things that Muslims are doing before a game, washing procedures and stuff like that … like Sadio (Mane) by the way, like Emre Can, by the way; they all do that. Nobody says what we have to be…
“Now we wait, that’s completely normal in a team and that’s how in an ideal world the world would work; we all try to understand each other and deal with all the little strange things for the one or the other.”
Sport sometimes aims for profundity when there is none. Witness any stomach-churning statement of national brilliance during an Olympics, or any underdog story, and you will find people deriving a lot more from some match than the simple “team scores more to win game” narrative that is most set in reality.
But the “Salah effect” has prompted real change off the pitch. From fans singing “I’ll be a Muslim, too” to appreciating the Liverpool talisman simply as a great player regardless of background, the “Egyptian King” is a genuine role model for his country, the region and Islam at a time when the world needs it most.
“We are all kind of ambassadors and sometimes we fit to that role and sometimes not, and at the moment Mo is the perfect ambassador for Egypt, for the whole Arabic world. I love that,” Klopp said.
So it is immaterial whether Salah wins the Champions League for Liverpool, beats Ronaldo to the Ballon d’Or or leads Egypt deep in the World Cup — he has already done more than most footballers do.
Should the positive image of both Arabs and Muslims he has created endure, then that will be his true mark of greatness.