Spotlight shifts to Hawk-Eye at Club World Cup

Updated 08 December 2012
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Spotlight shifts to Hawk-Eye at Club World Cup

TOYOTA, Japan: Widely used to settle potential flashpoints in tennis and cricket among other sports, Hawk-Eye’s goal-line technology is set for its first run-out at soccer’s Club World Cup.
Being deployed at the FIFA tournament alongside competing company GoalRef — installed in Yokohama — the Hawk-Eye system gets its turn in today’s quarterfinals in Toyota.
FIFA, initially reluctant, finally gave the go-ahead for technology to be used after Frank Lampard’s infamous disallowed goal for England against Germany at the 2010 World Cup.
Hawk-Eye’s managing director said on Saturday that he was hoping for a controversial goal-line incident for Hawk-Eye to be able to demonstrate its accuracy.
“We’re definitely hoping for a Luis Garcia moment,” Steve Carter told Reuters, referring to the “ghost goal” which knocked Chelsea out of the 2004-05 Champions League in the semi-finals.
“Hopefully we can have a phantom goal to prove to the world it works.
“Hawk-Eye doesn’t interfere with the ball, goals or posts. We think it is important for technology in sport to be as non-invasive as possible.” The technology was demonstrated at Toyota Stadium on Saturday, with “perfect” results, Carter added.
Hawk-Eye relies on seven high-speed cameras set up at different angles covering each goal to calculate decisions in a split second to the referee through a vibrating wristwatch.
GoalRef uses a microchip coil inside the ball and low magnetic waves around the goal.
Hawk-Eye deploys 10 cameras in tennis and six in cricket, where it was first used as a broadcast tool for the leg before wicket decision, tracking the trajectory of the ball.
Its use in tennis has largely eliminated the John McEnroe-type tantrums of bygone years with its system of instant replays after disputed points.
“We have 12 years of experience delivering technology in sport,” said Carter. “We cover more than 70 tennis tournaments globally, we also cover the majority of international cricket.
“Hawk-Eye has more to lose than anyone. If there was a problem with our football system there would be significant repercussions with our businesses in tennis and cricket.” GoalRef was used for the Club World Cup curtain raiser between Sanfrecce Hiroshima and Auckland City on Thursday but was not needed in a 1-0 for the Japanese champions.
Hiroshima face Egypt’s Al-Ahly and South Koreans Ulsan Hyundai meet Mexico’s Monterrey in Sunday’s quarterfinals in Toyota.
Dethroned European champions Chelsea and South American Libertadores Cup holders Corinthians join the competition at the semi-final stage next week.


Ahmed defends Pakistan squad as ‘best of the best’

Updated 30 min 58 sec ago
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Ahmed defends Pakistan squad as ‘best of the best’

  • Fawad Alam is a seasoned player, but the players we selected are also equally good and have been scoring continuously as well, says Pakistani skipper
  • Former test opener Ramiz Raja claims there are flaws in Alam’s batting technique

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed has defended the 16-man national squad for tours of Ireland and England as the “best of the best” despite criticism over the omission of batsman Fawad Alam.
“It’s not like I voted him (Alam) out,” Ahmed said on the last day of Pakistan’s training camp in Lahore on Saturday, adding that “I would have picked all the 25 ... but we had to pick the best of the best 16 players.”
Wasim Akram was among several former Pakistan test players who have criticized selectors for ignoring Alam in the middle order — especially since Misbah-ul-Haq and Younis Khan have now retired.
Alam was among 25 players called up for the camp after scoring consistently on the domestic circuit, but he failed to make the final squad.
Former test opener Ramiz Raja claimed there were flaws in Alam’s batting technique and that he would not have considered the left-hander, considering the tough conditions in England.
Ahmed played down the dispute.
“People can make as much reasons to talk, but there is nothing like flaws in anyone’s batting technique,” Ahmed said. “If you look back, Fawad had played a test in 2009 and he is a seasoned player ... (but) the players we selected are also equally good and have been scoring continuously as well.”
Ahmed said it had been a “unanimous decision” by coach, captain and selectors.
Pakistan has included uncapped batsmen Usman Salahuddin and Saad Ali in the final 16, as well as Fakhar Zaman, who has done well in limited-overs cricket but is yet to play a test match.
Misbah and Younis will be missed on a tour of England where Misbah scored a century at Lord’s in 2016 and Younis made 218 at The Oval in the fourth test to draw the series 2-2.
Pakistan has two four-day matches against Kent and Northamptonshire before meeting Ireland in a one-off test at Dublin, starting May 11. It plays two tests against England, starting May 24.
Pakistan will also play Scotland on June 12-13 in two Twenty20 Internationals.
Pakistan faced a major blow when its premier legspinner Yasir Shah was ruled out due to injury. However, Ahmed said he wasn’t sure that Shadab Khan, who has played just one test match, would make it to the final team with the English conditions more suitable for pace.
“The weather will be much cooler and I am not even sure if we are going to play a spinner,” Ahmed said.