Spotlight shifts to Hawk-Eye at Club World Cup

Updated 08 December 2012
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Spotlight shifts to Hawk-Eye at Club World Cup

TOYOTA, Japan: Widely used to settle potential flashpoints in tennis and cricket among other sports, Hawk-Eye’s goal-line technology is set for its first run-out at soccer’s Club World Cup.
Being deployed at the FIFA tournament alongside competing company GoalRef — installed in Yokohama — the Hawk-Eye system gets its turn in today’s quarterfinals in Toyota.
FIFA, initially reluctant, finally gave the go-ahead for technology to be used after Frank Lampard’s infamous disallowed goal for England against Germany at the 2010 World Cup.
Hawk-Eye’s managing director said on Saturday that he was hoping for a controversial goal-line incident for Hawk-Eye to be able to demonstrate its accuracy.
“We’re definitely hoping for a Luis Garcia moment,” Steve Carter told Reuters, referring to the “ghost goal” which knocked Chelsea out of the 2004-05 Champions League in the semi-finals.
“Hopefully we can have a phantom goal to prove to the world it works.
“Hawk-Eye doesn’t interfere with the ball, goals or posts. We think it is important for technology in sport to be as non-invasive as possible.” The technology was demonstrated at Toyota Stadium on Saturday, with “perfect” results, Carter added.
Hawk-Eye relies on seven high-speed cameras set up at different angles covering each goal to calculate decisions in a split second to the referee through a vibrating wristwatch.
GoalRef uses a microchip coil inside the ball and low magnetic waves around the goal.
Hawk-Eye deploys 10 cameras in tennis and six in cricket, where it was first used as a broadcast tool for the leg before wicket decision, tracking the trajectory of the ball.
Its use in tennis has largely eliminated the John McEnroe-type tantrums of bygone years with its system of instant replays after disputed points.
“We have 12 years of experience delivering technology in sport,” said Carter. “We cover more than 70 tennis tournaments globally, we also cover the majority of international cricket.
“Hawk-Eye has more to lose than anyone. If there was a problem with our football system there would be significant repercussions with our businesses in tennis and cricket.” GoalRef was used for the Club World Cup curtain raiser between Sanfrecce Hiroshima and Auckland City on Thursday but was not needed in a 1-0 for the Japanese champions.
Hiroshima face Egypt’s Al-Ahly and South Koreans Ulsan Hyundai meet Mexico’s Monterrey in Sunday’s quarterfinals in Toyota.
Dethroned European champions Chelsea and South American Libertadores Cup holders Corinthians join the competition at the semi-final stage next week.


‘Good, but not good enough’: Juan Antonio Pizzi on Saudi Arabia’s defeat to Uruguay

Updated 20 June 2018
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‘Good, but not good enough’: Juan Antonio Pizzi on Saudi Arabia’s defeat to Uruguay

  • A Luis Suaréz goal midway through the first half gave Uruguay a 1-0 win
  • Pizzi had spoken passionately about the need for his side to demonstrate a higher level of focus and performance

ROSTOV-ON-DON: Good, but not good enough.
That was what Juan Antonio Pizzi stated as he declared himself pleased with his team’s performance in the 1-0 defeat to Uruguay on Wednesday night.
But he lamented his side’s lack of firepower as they exited the World Cup after just two matches.
Pizzi had spoken passionately about the need for his side to demonstrate a higher level of focus and performance in Rostov-on-Don after losing their opening game 5-0 to hosts Russia in Moscow last week.
The Argentine got his wish with a display that saw the Green Falcons fight throughout and edge possession against a Uruguay side ranked 14th in the world.
A Luis Suaréz goal midway through the first half after poor goalkeeping from Mohammed Al-Owais, however, was enough to hand the Green Falcons a 12th successive World Cup defeat.
The result means that even with a win against Egypt on Monday, the Green Falcons are no longer capable of progressing to the knock-out stages from Group A.
“We had a lot of ball possession and were able to impose our style of play and distribution,” said Pizzi. “We conceded a goal from a random play and didn’t have the weapons or tools to try to equalize. We kept the ball well and weren’t really troubled defensively, but lacked that ability to score.”
Indeed, for all their possession, Saudi Arabia have managed just three shots on target in 180 minutes of football. Against Russia, they failed to muster a single effort on target and the managed just three against Uruguay, two of which came in the final minutes when they knew they had to score or face elimination. None of the three shots came from a striker.
“This is our weakness. We have good ball possession, but no effectiveness. We lack the depth and skill required to win these games,” Pizzi added. “We have that deficiency and have looked for solutions, but we haven’t quite come up with one yet. But that is one of the reasons great forward are in high demand and are the elite players in world football.”
Pizzi had made four changes ahead of the match, dropping goalkeeper Abdullah Al-Mayouf in favor of Al-Owais and introducing Ali Al-Bulayhi at the heart of the defense alongside Osama Hawsawi. Further upfield, Hattan Bahberi came in for Yahya Al-Shehri and Fahad Al-Muwallad replaced Mohammed Al-Sahlawi. The changes, particularly the inclusion of Bahberi, seemed to give the side more impetus in midfield.
“The difference between the performance in the first game and this game is enormous,” Pizzi said. “The only way to compete at this level is to play at the level we did here. And even then it was not enough even to get a draw. Undoubtedly there were other factors aside from the pressure of playing in the opening game that made a difference, but it’s true that the difference was enormous.”
Many critics had predicted a deluge of goals from the likes of Suarez and Cavani, yet both were kept at bay. Save for a couple of half-chances early on, neither came close to scoring until the 23rd minute.
A corner from Carlos Sanchez sailed into the area and when Al-Owais came for it but failed to connect with his punch, Barcelona forward Suaréz was left with the simplest of tap-ins. He was so caught off-guard, he actually looked surprised as he reeled away in celebration.
“I believe you cannot be relaxed in any match,” Suarez said when asked by a Uruguayan journalist whether he had taken it easy against the Saudis.
“We wanted to win and to progress to the knock-out stage and this game simply showed how difficult it is. That’s the World Cup for you though and we are obviously delighted with how we have performed so far to progress.”
Uruguay coach Oscar Tabarez did not share his striker’s sentiments.
“Saudi Arabia wanted to excel and give a better account of themselves after losing to Russia,” he said.
“They did that very well and we have to respect them. But what surprised me the most is how we played. We underperformed.”