Stanford opens 2-stroke lead in Mexico

Updated 11 November 2012
0

Stanford opens 2-stroke lead in Mexico

GUADALAJARA, Mexico: Angela Stanford shot a 5-under 67 on Friday to take a two-stroke lead over Inbee Park after the second round of the Lorena Ochoa Invitational.
The winner of the inaugural tournament in 2008, Stanford had an 11-under 133 total at Guadalajara Country Club. The Texan won the HSBC Women’s Champions in Singapore in February for her fifth LPGA Tour victory.
“I told somebody just earlier that Lorena has done so much for golf, especially in Mexico, I would be extremely honored to win her tournament twice,” Stanford said. “Because I do have so much respect for her and respect for what she’s done with the game. I think it’d be pretty cool to have your name on her trophy twice.”
Stanford had six birdies — four in a row on Nos. 7-10 — and one bogey. She hit 12 of 14 fairways and 16 of the 18 greens in regulation.
“I’ve said all along I love the golf course,” Stanford said. “I think anytime you feel extremely comfortable on the golf course, you tend to relax.”
Stanford is a fan favorite at the end, as evidenced by the “Angie! Angie!” chants as she proceed down a long line of fans waiting for her autograph.
“It’s kind of fun,” Stanford said. “I think this week is so much fun because it’s so relaxed, and it’s so laid back. Seems like, when things like that happen, it means that the fans are having fun. So that’s good.”
Park, from South Korea, had a 68. She has two victories this year and leads the money list.
“I love the people here and especially playing in Lorena’s event, it is a big honor,” Park said. Especially playing in the same golf tournament with Lorena. I feel very honored and hopefully someday I’ll be like her.”
Cristie Kerr was third at 8 under after a 69. She’s winless since the 2010 LPGA State Farm Classic.
“I just have to not get too high when good things happen and not get too low when you have to keep moving on,” Kerr said.” I just have to keep doing that. It’s going to happen again, it’s just a matter of when.”
Second-ranked Stacy Lewis, coming off her tour-leading fourth victory of the season Sunday in Japan, was 7 under along with So Yeon Ryu and Candie Kung. Lewis and Ryu shot 70, and Kung had a 71.
Lewis has a 58-point lead over Park with two events left in the player of the year points race, putting her in position to become the first American to win the award since Beth Daniel in 1994.
“I mean, after last week, I kind of looked at it, and then, I mean, it’s really almost impossible to catch Stacy,” Park said. “I play with Stacy the last two days and she was playing really great. I think it’s almost impossible for the Player of the Year. I’ll just give my best and just see what happens. I mean, Stacy’s playing great, too so, I think it’s not going to be easy.”

Michelle Wie, tied for the first-round lead with Stanford and Kung after a 66, had a 75 to drop into a tie for 12th at 3 under. Wie won the 2010 tournament.
Top-ranked Yani Tseng also was 3 under after a 71.
Ochoa was 1 under after a 72. The Mexican star won 27 LPGA Tour titles before retiring at age 28 in 2010. She missed the event last year before the birth of son Pedro in December.
Suzann Pettersen, coming off consecutive victories in South Korea and Taiwan, was even par after a 74.


Liverpool's Andrew Robertson ready for Roma Champions League test

Updated 23 April 2018
0

Liverpool's Andrew Robertson ready for Roma Champions League test

  • Young Scottish star was very impressive during Liverpool's 5-1 aggregate destruction of Man City in last-eight clash.
  • Robertson refuses to take Roma lightly after their shock victory over Barcelona in the last round.

LIVERPOOL: With a desire stoked in the stands of Parkhead, Andrew Robertson is now fired up to fulfil a childhood dream.
While following the fortunes of Celtic, the defender’s first Champions League final memory was when Zinedine Zidane volleyed Real Madrid to success in 2002 as the contest was staged in Robertson’s home city of Glasgow. He was just eight years old.
While Robertson was deemed too small to play for his boyhood idols, released at 15 with a future uncertain, he has grown to prove his worth on Europe’s biggest club stage with Liverpool.
Now, with a semifinal encounter against AS Roma after beating Premier League champions Manchester City in the last eight, he wants to emulate those Reds heroes who lifted the trophy five times before.
“I was a big Celtic fan growing up and my heroes were Henrik Larsson and Co,” Robertson told Arab News ahead of tonight’s first-leg clash 
at Anfield.
“But these heroes who have won the European Cup and Champions League for Liverpool, you have to look up to them — and we want to emulate them and hopefully get a winner’s medal too.
“The club’s won it five times and the history of the club has always been this, the Champions League, where the fans create a special atmosphere and the club challenges for the trophy. It would be unbelievable to be a part of that history.
“This is the highlight for me so far and an incredible feeling, but it just makes you hungry for more. I don’t want it to end.
“As a kid, you sit back and watch how great it would be to play in this competition, let alone in the final.
“I always used to go to Celtic and we didn’t progress very far in the Champions League, but the occasions at Parkhead were always unbelievable.
“The fans at Celtic are incredible, world renowned, but Anfield was unbelievable against Man City and we have another chance for them to create that same atmosphere and hopefully we can put in another great performance.”
Having beaten Pep Guardiola’s City so convincingly, 5-1 over two gripping games, Liverpool will start favorites against Roma.
That is despite the Italians upsetting Barcelona in the previous round with an epic 3-0 win in the second leg after a 4-1 loss at the Nou Camp.
But Robertson will take nothing for granted against a Roma side who last reached the final in 1984 where they were beaten by Liverpool in a penalty shootout at their Stadio Olimpico home.
“Barca are an unbelievable team,” added the Scotland left-back, 24. “But let’s not kid ourselves. For Roma to score three goals against Barcelona, that’s special.
“They’ve been unbelievable this season too in the Champions League and deserve to be in the semifinals. It will definitely not be an easy game.
“But once you get to the semis, the fear of who you are playing has gone because you know how good the teams are.
“It’s like you look forward to the possibility of playing in the final, that’s what drives you forward. We will have fire in our bellies because we are so close to getting there.”
Jurgen Klopp’s men will no doubt be looking to Mohamed Salah to conjure more magic against the club he left in the summer for £36.9 million ($51.5 million).
But Robertson insisted Liverpool are no one-man team and the Egyptian, crowned PFA Player of the Year on Sunday night after scoring 41 goals in an unforgettable campaign, epitomizes a team united and ambitious in their quest for glory.
“He’s just unbelievable,” said Robertson of the frontman.
“In the first half (of the second leg) against Man City we struggled to get him in the game and he wasn’t quite at it. But the second half he was different class and pops up with a goal to help us win it. That’s what he does.
“His goals have been incredible and long may that continue. He’s a great guy, so humble, and for someone who has done so much this season he’s so down to Earth.
“That’s credit to our squad because we don’t let anyone get ahead of themselves.
“Mo is no different, he’s a lovely person and stands for what we are as a team.”

 

HEART OF GOLD

Five years ago Andrew Robertson was playing in the fourth tier of Scottish football with Queen’s Park and earning extra money by selling concert tickets in the corporate offices at Hampden Park.
Last summer he suffered relegation from the Premier League with Hull City before Liverpool signed him for £10 million ($13.9 million).
In a career fraught with setbacks and hardships, he has been grateful, supporting foodbanks that help those in need.
“It’s all about giving something back to the less fortunate,” said Robertson.
“I’m in a fortunate position where I do a job I love and get paid well and it’s nice to give something back, especially in my hometown. I’ll always do that.
“It’s been a great journey for me in my career, and I’ve enjoyed every minute. But I don’t forget where I came from. Maybe it is rare, but a lot more people are doing it now and I hope even more will.”