Statue of Liberty lit for 1st time since Sandy

Updated 11 November 2012
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Statue of Liberty lit for 1st time since Sandy

NEW YORK: The Statue of Liberty was illuminated Friday evening for the first time since it was closed due to damage on Liberty Island caused by Superstorm Sandy.
The statue, one of the city’s top tourist attractions, has been closed because of damage to the island resulting from the storm that hit New York Oct. 29, with no estimate on when it will reopen to visitors.
The statue sits on a small island in New York Harbor, and can be seen from many vantage points around New York City.
The monument was re-lit through temporary measures made possible by a donation of equipment and services from Musco Lighting to the National Park Foundation, which is the official charity of America’s national parks, according to a statement from the National Park Service. Another company, Natoli Construction, handled the lighting of the statue’s torch and crown.
The temporary lighting will remain in place until permanent repairs are made.
Mike Litterst, a spokesman for the National Park Service, said it was not clear in advance whether the Friday lighting would include the torch “so it was a pleasant surprise to be able to get the torch lit tonight.”
The statue’s lamp is held aloft by its raised arm and marks the highest point of the 305-foot-tall (93 meters) monument, which was dedicated in 1886. “The New Colossus,” a poem by Emma Lazarus engraved inside the statue’s pedestal, refers to the beacon in its final line: “I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”


Prince William visits Jordan’s Roman ruins at Jerash

Updated 14 min 19 sec ago
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Prince William visits Jordan’s Roman ruins at Jerash

AMMAN: Britain’s Prince William visited the Roman ruins of Jerash in northern Jordan on Monday, accompanied by his host Crown Prince Hussein bin Abdullah as part of a historic Middle East tour.
The two princes met children from Jordan and neighboring war-torn Syria during their visit to the site, 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of Amman.
The visit to Jordan by the second in line to the British throne has been billed as a chance to bond with Hussein, a fellow graduate of Britain’s Royal Sandhurst Military Academy.
William was also due to meet British troops based in the kingdom, before heading across the River Jordan to Israel and the Palestinian territories.
The Duke of Cambridge and the heir to the Jordanian throne strolled along Jerash’s Colonnaded Street, a paved promenade lined with towering columns.
They also visited the Temple of Artemis, built on an elevated part of the site in honor of the goddess believed to protect the city, which was at its most prosperous in the third century.
When they reached the ancient site’s theater they were greeted by Syrian and Jordanian school children in traditional dress, who gave a performance including music and poetry.
The show was organized by the Makany Center, a UNESCO-backed program providing health and education to both Syrian and Jordanian pupils.
Some 650,000 Syrian refugees have registered with the United Nations in Jordan since fleeing their country’s seven-year war which was sparked by peaceful anti-government protests in 2011.
Amman estimates the actual number is closer to 1.3 million people and says it has spent more than $10 billion (8.5 billion euros) hosting them.
William paid tribute in a speech on Sunday to “the way in which you opened your doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees,” even as Jordan said the same day that it would be unable to host any new wave of asylum seekers.
His Middle East tour will see William become the first British royal to pay official visits to both Israel and the Palestinian territories.
William, who is president of the Football Association, was flying into Jordan as England thrashed Panama 6-1 in the World Cup on Sunday, but he caught a recording of the match on television at his host’s home.