Sudan says US reneged on promise to lift curbs

Updated 03 November 2012
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Sudan says US reneged on promise to lift curbs

KHARTOUM: Sudan has accused the US of reneging on commitments to remove sanctions, after Washington extended the 15-year-old trade restrictions.
Then-president Bill Clinton imposed the embargo in 1997 over Sudan’s support for international terrorism, efforts to destabilize neighboring governments, and human rights violations.
President Barack Obama has approved the sanctions for another year, saying the actions of the Sudanese government “continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.”
This year’s sanctions renewal came one week after Sudan accused Israel of sending four radar-evading aircraft to strike a military factory, which exploded and burned in the heart of Khartoum at midnight on Oct. 23.
Sudan’s Foreign Ministry called the US sanctions “basically political,” with the aim of hindering the country’s development. It said the embargo benefits armed rebel groups while violating international law.
“Many times the American administration agreed that Sudan is meeting its commitments but they are always retreating from their promises to remove the sanctions,” the ministry said in a statement.
“The Sudanese government repeats its strong rejection of the sanctions renewal and strongly condemns the behavior of the American administration.”
From 1991 to 1996 Sudan hosted Al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden, who was killed in Pakistan by US Navy SEALS last year.
The US State Department continues to list Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism but, in a July report, said Khartoum was “a cooperative counterterrorism partner” last year.
Except for Hamas, the government “does not openly support the presence of terrorist elements within its borders,” the report said.
It added that Sudan maintains a relationship with Iran, another terrorism sponsor.
The sanctions limit access to external financing for Sudan’s indebted economy, which lost the bulk of its export revenue when South Sudan separated in July last year with most of the country’s oil production.


Iraq carries out more air strikes against Daesh in Syria

Updated 25 May 2018
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Iraq carries out more air strikes against Daesh in Syria

  • At least 65 senior Daesh leaders live in Hajjin.
  • Hajjin is in Deir Ezzor province in eastern Syria, about 50 kilometers (just over 30 miles) from Iraq’s border.

BAGHDAD: Iraq announced Friday it had carried out air strikes against Daesh in Syria, the third cross border aerial operation inside a month in its war-torn neighbor.
“Iraqi F-16 planes carried out (Thursday) morning raids against the headquarters of Daesh terrorist gang leaders and an explosives depot occupied by terrorists in Syria’s Hajjin region,” a statement by Iraq’s operations command said.
A video released with the text shows a strike on a huge building surrounded by palm trees and a wall.
The images show the wall and the building collapsing simultaneously.
Several strikes have been carried out by Iraq or the international coalition since Thursday against the center of Hajjin, the last major area held by Daesh in Syria, said the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights war monitor.
At least 65 senior Daesh leaders live in Hajjin, the Observatory’s director Rami Abdel Rahman told AFP.
Hajjin is in Deir Ezzor province in eastern Syria, about 50 kilometers (just over 30 miles) from Iraq’s border.
It has been surrounded since the end of 2017 by the Syrian Democratic Forces, an alliance of Kurdish and Arab fighters backed by the United States and France, Abdel Rahman said.
Several hundred prisoners are still held by the militants in Hajjin, he added.
Since April, Iraq’s air force has carried out several air strikes on Daesh held Syrian territory close to the border between the two countries.
Daesh seized a third of Iraq in 2014, before the government declared victory in December, but the military has continued regular operations along the porous Syrian border.