Survey: Greece seen as most corrupt in EU

Updated 05 December 2012
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Survey: Greece seen as most corrupt in EU

BERLIN: An international watchdog group says a new survey shows the countries worst hit by the European financial crisis are also seen as among the most corrupt in the European Union.
Transparency International’s annual Corruption Perceptions Index released Wednesday shows Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece with the lowest scores in western Europe.
Where 0 is “highly corrupt” and 100 is “very clean,” Greece scored a 36, Italy 42, Portugal 63 and Spain, 65.
By comparison, Denmark and Finland tied with New Zealand at the top of the list with scores of 90, while Germany scored 79, the UK 74 and the US 73.
Overall, the countries seen as most corrupt were Somalia, North Korea and Afghanistan — all of which scored eight.
Two-thirds of the 176 countries ranked scored below 50.


Trump welcomes Macron at White House

Updated 18 min 58 sec ago
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Trump welcomes Macron at White House

  • The arrival was heavy on pomp, with nearly 500 US service-members from all five military branches participating in the ceremonial welcome.
  • Pomp and ceremony aside, Trump and Macron disagree on some fundamental issues. A prime dividing point is the multinational Iran nuclear deal.

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump welcomed French President Emmanuel Macron to the White House in a formal arrival ceremony.
The president and first lady greeted Macron and his wife, Brigitte Macron, on a rolled-out red carpet on the South Lawn.
The arrival was heavy on pomp, with nearly 500 US service-members from all five military branches participating in the ceremonial welcome, which included a “Review of the Troops.”
Vice President Mike Pence and several members of Trump’s Cabinet, lawmakers, and military families were in attendance. The audience included students from the Maya Angelou French Immersion School in Temple Hills, Maryland.
The two leaders are spending the morning in meetings and then will hold a joint news conference. 
The pageantry of Macron’s official state visit, the first of the Trump presidency, comes Tuesday night with a lavish state dinner at the White House. About 150 guests are expected to dine on rack of lamb and nectarine tart and enjoy an after-dinner performance by the Washington National Opera.
Monday night was more relaxed, featuring a helicopter tour of Washington landmarks and a trip to the Potomac River home of George Washington for dinner.
Pomp and ceremony aside, Trump and Macron disagree on some fundamental issues. A prime dividing point is the multinational Iran nuclear deal, which Trump wants to abandon.