Sweden tells jobless youth to look for work in Greece

Updated 30 January 2013
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Sweden tells jobless youth to look for work in Greece

STOCKHOLM: Sweden’s government-funded employment agency on Monday launched a campaign encouraging unemployed Swedish youths to look for summer jobs in crisis-stricken Mediterranean countries including Spain and Greece.
The jobs, most of them in the hotel and entertainment sectors, will mainly serve Swedish tourists.
“We hope our Swedish youths will get every single one of these jobs. These companies have had good experience of young Swedish workers,” said Kristina Gaerdebro Johansson, a European Employment Services (EURES) adviser at the Swedish agency.
Hundreds of jobs in Greece, Spain, Italy and Cyprus — all popular tourist destinations for Swedes — will be marketed at a special event organized by the country’s employment agency and EURES in the southern city of Malmoe next week.
The positions include football coaches, aerobics instructors and dancers at hotels and resorts around the Mediterranean. Some of the jobs require Scandinavian language skills, but not all of them, said Gaerdebro Johansson.
Youth unemployment in Greece and Spain currently stands at more than 50 percent.
Although Sweden’s export-driven economy is beginning to feel the effects of Europe’s economic woes, it has posted strong growth since making a quick recovery from the 2008 recession. It also has a low level of government debt.
But youth unemployment has remained above the European average, reaching a seasonally adjusted 23.9 percent in December.
Sweden’s employment agency is offering to reimburse those who want to travel to the Mediterranean job fair from other parts of the country.
“This is a great opportunity if you want to enter the job market,” Gaerdebro Johansson said.
nsb/bm


Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

Updated 21 June 2018
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Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

TOKYO: A Japanese city official has been reprimanded and fined for repeatedly leaving his desk during work hours — but only for around three minutes to buy lunch.
The official, who works at the waterworks bureau in the western city of Kobe, began his designated lunch break early 26 times over the space of seven months, according to a city spokesman.
“The lunch break is from noon to 1 pm. He left his desk before the break,” the spokesman said on Thursday.
The official, 64, had half a day’s pay docked as punishment and the bosses called a news conference to apologize.
“It’s deeply regrettable that this misconduct took place. We’re sorry,” a bureau official told reporters, bowing deeply.
The worker was in violation of a public service law stating that officials have to concentrate on their jobs, according to the bureau.
The news sparked a heated debate on Japanese social media, with many defending the official.
“It’s sheer madness. It’s crazy. What about leaving your desk to smoke?” said one Twitter user.
“Is this a bad joke? Does this mean we cannot even go to the bathroom?” said another.
The city had previously suspended another official in February for a month after he had left his office numerous times to buy a ready-made lunch box during work hours.
The official was absent a total of 55 hours over six months, according to the city.