SWPF 2012 to focus on fostering innovation

Updated 01 December 2012
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SWPF 2012 to focus on fostering innovation

The three-day Saudi Water & Power Forum & Exhibition (SWPF) 2012 taking place in Jeddah from today will focus on adding value by creating opportunities, building relationships and fostering innovation. SWPF is the premier power and water meeting in the Kingdom and plays a critical role in connecting stakeholders and in helping to set the agenda for sustainable growth.
SWCC Gov. Abdulrahman Al-Ibrahim, will join Khalid Al-Sulaiman, vice president for renewable energy, K.A. CARE in the opening session of the forum taking place today and discuss Desalination & Renewable Energy: A Sustainable Solution.
Other distinguished key speakers include Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal, Minister of Water & Electricity Abdullah Al-Hussayen, Global Water Intelligence Publisher Christopher Gasson ; Saudi Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC) Director General Naif Al-Abbadi, Deputy Governor for Planning & Development, SWCC Abdullah Abdulaziz Al-AlShaikh,; Marafiq President & CEO Thamer Al-Sharhan, Taqnia CEO Fahad Al-Hussain, ACWA Power President & CEO Paddy Padmanathan, Saur CEO Olivier Brousse, and Unilever KSA Managing Director Yasser Joharji.
The forum and exhibition will highlight the Kingdom's reforms and programs in these infrastructural sectors as well as covering topics like water reuse, renewable energy, efficiency opportunities, tariff reform, water and power cogeneration, policy updates; technology and innovation, talent management, and membrane technology.
SWPF will take a fresh look at the opportunities for participation and will focus on how we can work together to meet growing demand for more efficient use and sustainable water and power.
Today, Saudi Arabia is considered an interesting destination for key investors, especially in the water and power sector with net investments that exceed SR 100 billion. The Saudi government's ambitious plans to upgrade, expand and transform the power and water sector are under way and exciting opportunities abound for those supplying products, services and expertise to the industry.
SWPF is the largest gathering of water and power industry in Saudi Arabia. It brings together local and international bodies to acquire knowledge, contacts and partnerships required for business development in one of the largest markets for power and water in the world.
The highly prestigious SWPF is celebrating 8 years of excellence and is recognized in the industry for being exceptional for its support and endorsement from key government bodies, leading industry figures and companies.
The event enjoys support from Moya Bushnak, who in partnership with the Saudi Ministry of Water & Electricity and the CWC Group has developed this industry-specific event. The forum and exhibition provides unrivalled opportunities to network with the most influential people in the industry and unique insights into solutions and possibilities for doing business.


US unveils new veto threat against WTO rulings

Updated 23 June 2018
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US unveils new veto threat against WTO rulings

  • US tells WTO appeals rulings in trade disputes could be vetoed if they took longer than the allowed 90 days
  • Trump, who has railed against the WTO judges in the past, threatens to levy a 20 percent import tax on European Union cars

GENEVA: The United States ramped up its challenge to the global trading system on Friday, telling the World Trade Organization that appeals rulings in trade disputes could be vetoed if they took longer than the allowed 90 days.
The statement by US Ambassador Dennis Shea threatened to erode a key element of trade enforcement at the 23-year-old WTO: binding dispute settlement, which is widely seen as a major bulwark against protectionism.
It came as US President Donald Trump, who has railed against the WTO judges in the past, threatened to levy a 20 percent import tax on European Union cars, the latest in an unprecedented campaign of threats and tariffs to punish US trading partners.
Shea told the WTO’s dispute settlement body that rulings by the WTO’s Appellate Body, effectively the supreme court of world trade, were invalid if they took too long. Rulings would no longer be governed by “reverse consensus,” whereby they are blocked only if all WTO members oppose them.
“The consequence of the Appellate Body choosing to breach (WTO dispute) rules and issue a report after the 90-day deadline would be that this report no longer qualifies as an Appellate Body report for purposes of the exceptional negative consensus adoption procedure,” Shea said, according to a copy of his remarks provided to Reuters.
An official who attended the meeting said other WTO members agreed that the Appellate Body should stick to the rules, but none supported Shea’s view that late rulings could be vetoed, and many expressed concern about his remarks.
Rulings are routinely late because, the WTO says, disputes are abundant and complex. Things have slowed further because Trump is blocking new judicial appointments, increasing the remaining judges’ already bulging workload.
At Friday’s meeting the United States maintained its opposition to the appointment of judges, effectively signalling a veto of one judge hoping for reappointment to the seven-seat bench in September.
Without him, the Appellate Body will only have three judges, the minimum required for every dispute, putting the system at severe risk of breakdown if any of the three judges cannot work on a case for legal or other reasons.
“Left unaddressed, these challenges can cripple, paralyze, or even extinguish the system,” chief judge Ujal Singh Bhatia said.
Sixty-six WTO member states are backing a petition that asks the United States to allow appointments to go ahead. On Friday, US ally Japan endorsed the petition for the first time, meaning that all the major users of the dispute system were united in opposition to Trump.