Tax exile Depardieu selling historic Paris mansion

Updated 13 December 2012
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Tax exile Depardieu selling historic Paris mansion

PARIS: French actor Gerard Depardieu, under fire for becoming a tax exile, is selling his historic Paris mansion, real estate agents Daniel Feau said Thursday amid reports of a 50-million-euro price tag.
The hotel de Chambon in the heart of the Saint-Germain-des-Pres quarter, home to several global celebrities, is a listed property with a living area of 1,800 square meters (19,300 square feet), Daniel Feau said.
Built in 1820 for the Baron de Chambon, it boasts gardens and a swimming pool — rare and highly-prized assets in the center of the French capital.
Daniel Feau would not confirm media reports that the actor, who acquired the property in 2003, was asking 50 million euros ($65 million).
Depardieu, 63, has joined some of France’s wealthiest business figures in Belgium following moves by the Socialist government to tax annual incomes above one million euros ($1.3 million) at 75 percent, as well as hiking taxes on “grand fortunes” and inherited assets.
His move has been denounced as “pathetic” by Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault.
The tax measures would potentially hit Depardieu hard. The Cyrano de Bergerac star can command up to two million euros per film.
He also has extensive business interests, including wine estates and three restaurants in the center of Paris.


Review: A political artist talks humanity, refugees and mass migration

Updated 22 April 2018
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Review: A political artist talks humanity, refugees and mass migration

BEIRUT: This precious blue book is a compilation of famed Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s thoughts on the global refugee crisis, edited by prominent American collector and publisher Larry Warsh. “Humanity” is full of important messages that can be delivered at any time, hence the handy, bag-friendly size.
The quotations, selected from interviews, magazine features and podcasts from around the world, show Ai Weiwei’s thoughts on humanity, mass migration and refugees.
According to his interview excerpts, the artist believes we have lost the capacity for compassion.
“The refugee crisis is not about refugees, rather, it is about us. Our prioritization of financial gain over people’s struggle for the necessities of life is the primary cause of much of this crisis. The West has all but abandoned its belief in humanity and support for the precious ideals contained in declarations on universal human rights, it has sacrificed these ideals for short-sighted cowardice and greed,” he once said.
Ai Weiwei understands how it feels to be completely destitute in a foreign land, with nothing but one’s humanity. In 1959, during the Cultural Revolution, he accompanied his father to a labor camp in the Gobi Desert. When he returned to Beijing with his parents in 1975, he was 19 and determined to fight against injustice. Not afraid to criticize the Chinese authorities, he became an outspoken artist-cum-activist. He is now considered one of the most iconic artists of our times. He was detained in 2011 at Beijing airport, remained in custody for 81 days and was subsequently placed under house arrest. His passport was taken away and returned in 2015. That same year, Amnesty International awarded Ai Weiwei the Ambassador of Conscience Award for his work in defense of human rights and he relocated to Berlin.
Each quote in this book pricks our conscience, makes us feel uncomfortable, and reminds us that our indifference and and lack of action toward other human beings is inhuman.
For example, in the book, the artist is quoted as saying: “Allowing borders to determine your thinking is incompatible with the modern era.”
A powerful statement that is one of many to be found in this thought-provoking read.