Terry out for weeks not months — Chelsea

Updated 12 November 2012
0

Terry out for weeks not months — Chelsea

LONDON: John Terry has suffered “no significant damage” following a scan on his right knee and will be out for weeks rather than months, Chelsea announced yesterday.
Injury cut short Terry’s return to action during the Blues’ 1-1 draw at home to Liverpool in the Premier League on Sunday.
However, a Chelsea statement said Monday: “Today’s MRI scans on John Terry’s right knee thankfully show no significant damage to the cruciate ligaments.
“Chelsea Football Club’s medical team will conduct further tests over the next two or three days once the swelling has subsided to determine how long John will be out, but it will be a matter of weeks not months.” Having to do without Terry for any length of time is still a blow to Chelsea, who have struggled defensively in their captain’s domestic four-game absence while serving a racism ban and have slipped from first to third in the Premier League.
Terry is now in line to miss the European champions’ potentially vital Champions League Group E game at Juventus, as well as league matches against West Brom and Manchester City.
He could even be a doubt for Chelsea’s Club World Cup trip to Japan early next month.
But goalkeeper Petr Cech, Chelsea’s acting captain in the absence of Terry and Frank Lampard, said the side could cope without the center-half.
“We managed to play games without him and we have players who will have a chance to impress,” he said.
“I have confidence. Obviously, it’s a pity we will lose him again but we have a large squad and quality defenders to deal with that.” Terry, in his first league match since serving a four-game ban for racially abusing Queens Park Rangers defender Anton Ferdinand in a match last season, scored against Liverpool at Stamford Bridge with a 20th-minute header.
It was the former England defender’s 50th goal in all competitions for Chelsea but he was forced to leave the fray less than 20 minutes later.
Terry went down clutching his right leg after an accidental collision with Liverpool striker Luis Suarez and was carried from the field on a stretcher in the 39th minute, with Gary Cahill coming on in his place.
His departure left Chelsea down to two fit center-backs in Cahill and Branislav Ivanovic, with David Luiz sidelined by tonsilitis and Ashley Cole nursing a hamstring problem.
Uruguay international Suarez took to Twitter after the game to send Terry his best wishes.
“Hugs to Terry, I hope it’s nothing serious,” he wrote.


Why even the #WengerOut brigade should lament Arsene Wenger's exit from Arsenal

Updated 21 April 2018
0

Why even the #WengerOut brigade should lament Arsene Wenger's exit from Arsenal

  • The Frenchman revolutionised the game in England across all leagues, not just the Premier League.
  • After initial success he found the going tough in the second half of his reign, but will still go down as an all-time great.

Over the past few seasons it has been fashionable to view Arsene Wenger as some sort of figure of fun — a man living in the past, left behind by the modern game, but too stubborn to realize it.
In time, though, even the most ardent, frothing-at-the-mouth #WengerOut believer would have to agree that the Frenchman will go down not just as one of the best managers Arsenal have had, but also among the greatest in English club football.
As with any caricature, there is a hint of truth in the picture created, crude as it sometimes is. Yes, Wenger’s past few years at the Emirates have been painful to watch. Yes, he was stubborn when it came to both activity in the transfer market and belief in his methods and tactics. Yes, it is fair to say he leaves the club, on the pitch at least, in a bit of a mess. And, yes, he should have left two or three years ago.
But if there is one thing that any sane fan should remember about Wenger’s 22 years as Arsenal boss, it is this: He was a game-changer, a manager who oversaw not only a revolution of the Gunners, but also of the English game.
As soon as Wenger landed in England in 1996, he banished Arsenal’s Tuesday drinking club and munching of Mars bars — in their place came stretching sessions and broccoli. Hardly profound or radical in today’s game, but this was the era when change in English football invariably meant no pies and pints on a Friday night.
The technical, passing, possession football that is now the norm for any side with ambitions to remain in the Premier League, let alone win it, and the idea that eating vegetables rather than a tub of lard would help player performance, were brought in by Wenger alone.
He won the double in his first full season in charge, signed unheralded foreign talent such as Emmanuel Petit and Patrick Viera — who went on to become world-class players — and created teams that were a joy to watch, culminating with “The Invincibles” of 2003-04, who won the Premier League without losing a match.
The irony is that the one-time revolutionary ended up being viewed as a throwback, a stuck-in-the-mud anachronism; a manager who harked back to a time when playing with the owner’s chequebook was not seen as the only path to success and when paragraphs were favored over 140 characters.
And that perhaps explains why so many Arsenal fans seemingly wanted him gone: Wenger is not of the Twitter generation, of instant opinions for the 24-hour news agenda and of hype over humility. The man who was once seen as the future stuck to principles that were deemed as belonging to the past.
It is clear there is a lot of bad blood at the club — a ridiculous Facebook post by an Arsenal fan claimed Wenger’s announcement he was leaving made it the “greatest day in Arsenal’s history.”
But for all the bluster and nonsense, Wenger’s legacy will be that of “The Invincibles” — one of the greatest club sides of modern times; of beautiful football played at pace and with artistry; of being a decent, yet flawed, man who was never anything but articulate and courteous.
Having been in charge of Arsenal for 22 years, he is undoubtedly the last of a kind, and in the era of trigger-happy owners, short-term fixes and sensationalism over stability, that is something everyone, even the #WengerOut brigade, should lament.