Toyota’s new RAV4 SUV arrives with multitude of driver-focused features

Updated 18 January 2013
0

Toyota’s new RAV4 SUV arrives with multitude of driver-focused features

First seen in a sneak preview at the recent Saudi International Motor Show (SIMS) in Jeddah, Toyota ALJ has now launched sales of the fourth-generation all-new 2013 RAV4 SUV (sport utility vehicle) across Saudi Arabia.
“We are very excited to bring this superb SUV to the Saudi market,” said Adel Ezzat, MD marketing at Abdul Latif Jameel (ALJ), authorized distributor of Toyota in Saudi Arabia. "The RAV4 is a bold reinvention of the world’s original crossover SUV, offering balanced performance and capability, while being more engaging and fun to drive. It also offers great fuel efficiency, spacious rear space, striking design, and a compelling array of standard features."
The 2013 RAV4 draws on the innovative heritage of the original model, which started an industry trend and sets a new standard for the compact SUV market with more than 4.5 million units sold since 1994 in over 150 countries. Offering customers sophisticated dynamic and strong styling, refined, premium-quality interior design and a new Dynamic Torque Control 4WD, in addition to being a more engaging and fun drive with fuel efficient powertrain, the RAV 4 comes with the assurance of three generations of satisfied customers, he added.
According to Makoto Arimoto, RAV4 chief engineer at Toyota Motor Corporation, “With the 2013 RAV4, what we have achieved is a sportier driving experience characteristic of a 4WD vehicle while enhancing the agile handling performance. Over 700 staff members came together to prioritize the feelings of each customer in the development of the new-generation RAV4.”
The sporty new front defines RAV4’s athletic presence and sophisticated strength. In a significant break with its heritage, the RAV4 switches from its side-hinged rear door to a convenient roof-hinged liftgate with a spare tire stored under the cargo floor.
The new RAV4’s interior has a premium, sophisticated look with soft-touch accents and driver-centric controls. The driver-centric dash panel and the gauges all feature new Clear Blue illumination, which provides crisp visibility in most ambient light conditions. All steering wheels have controls for audio, Bluetooth hands-free phone and audio.
The 2013 RAV4 arrives with a multitude of driver-focused features, including a Sport Mode for enhanced performance and road feel.


Monkeys run amok in India’s corridors of power

A monkey sits on a pavement outside India's Parliament building in New Delhi, India, November 15, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 11 December 2018
0

Monkeys run amok in India’s corridors of power

  • Monkeys have bred rapidly in Delhi and neighboring states as they have protected status, but there is no official estimate of their numbers

NEW DELHI: India’s government faces a tough re-election battle next year but first it must deal with an opponent as wily as any political rival, troops of monkeys that have become a big threat around its offices in New Delhi.
Red-faced rhesus macaques have spread havoc, snatching food and mobile telephones, breaking into homes and terrorizing people in and around the Indian capital.
They have colonized areas around parliament and the sites of key ministries, from the prime minister’s office to the finance and defense ministries, frightening both civil servants and the public.
“Very often they snatch food from people as they are walking, and sometimes they even tear files and documents by climbing in through the windows,” said Ragini Sharma, a home ministry employee.
Ahead of Tuesday’s start of parliament’s winter session, an advisory to members of parliament last month detailed ways they could keep simian attacks at bay. Don’t tease or make direct eye contact with a monkey, the advisory said, and definitely don’t get between a mother and her infant.
The rapid growth of cities has displaced macaques, geographically the most widely distributed primates in the world after humans, driving them into human habitats to hunt for food.
Many in Hindu-majority India revere and feed the animals they consider to be connected to the demigod Hanuman, who takes the form of a monkey.
“This socio-religious tradition of feeding has created a vicious cycle,” said ecology researcher Asmita Sengupta.
“They become used to being fed by humans and lose their sense of fear,” said Sengupta, of the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
“They start actively seeking supplementary food and if we don’t feed them, they turn aggressive.”

’APE REPELLERS’
The monkeys have hardly proved an ally for Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Hundreds of macaques feasting on optic fiber cables strung along the banks of the river Ganges derailed his plan to roll out wifi in his constituency, the crowded 3,000-year-old holy city of Varanasi, in 2015.
Men were hired to swat the monkeys away with broomsticks and slingshots, when then US President Barack Obama toured New Delhi that year, media said.
Some monkey-human encounters have turned tragic.
In 2007, monkeys pushed the deputy mayor of Delhi, S.S. Bajwa, off his balcony to his death. Last month, one of the animals snatched a 12-day-old boy from his mother and killed him in Agra, home to the famed monument to love, the Taj Mahal.
Monkeys have bred rapidly in Delhi and neighboring states as they have protected status, but there is no official estimate of their numbers.
India has tried several strategies to fight the menace.
Several years ago, it brought in larger, black-faced langurs, feared by the macaques, to patrol key areas but that stopped after it became illegal to keep langurs in captivity.
Authorities stumbled on a partially successful solution four years ago, after hiring 40 men to disguise themselves as langurs and squeal monkey-like to try and terrify the macaques away.
“We call them ‘ape repellers’ and they are contract employees,” said a government official, who asked not to be identified. The stratagem works temporarily as the monkeys flee on hearing the calls, but they return once the men depart.
Primatologist S.M. Mohnot recommends sterilization and moving the animals to forests, as well as lifting a ban on their capture for biomedical research and resuming exports of the macaques, as components of a solution.
“The monkey menace can be checked only by a multi-pronged approach,” said Mohnot, the chairman of the Primate Research Center, a federal institute in the western city of Jodhpur.