Toyota recalls vehicles for steering, pump defects

Updated 14 November 2012
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Toyota recalls vehicles for steering, pump defects

TOKYO: Toyota Motor Corp. is recalling 2.77 million vehicles around the world for a water pump problem and a steering shaft defect that may result in faulty steering — the latest in a spate of quality woes for Japan’s top automaker.
No accidents have been reported related to these two problems announced Wednesday, according to Toyota.
Some 1.51 million vehicles are being recalled for the steering defect in Japan and 1.25 million vehicles abroad — including 670,000 in the US Affected models include the Prius hybrid, Corolla, Wish and other models produced from 2000 to 2011 in Japan, and from 2000 to 2009 overseas.
Of those vehicles, some 620,000 spanning five hybrid models, including the Prius, have a defective water pump in addition to the steering shaft defect. Those vehicles were produced from 2001 to 2010 in Japan, and from 2003 to 2011 overseas. Another 10,000 vehicles with only a pump problem are also being recalled.
The latest recalls — affecting Toyota’s prized Prius hybrid, a symbol of its technological prowess — come on top of a recall last month for 7.43 million vehicles for a faulty power-window switch that could cause fires.
Toyota has been trying to fix its reputation after a series of massive recalls of 14 million vehicles over the last several years, mostly in the US, affecting faulty floor mats, braking and gas pedals.
Before that, Toyota had boasted a reputation for pristine quality, centered around its super-lean production methods that empowered workers to hone in on quality control. Toyota executives have acknowledged the escalating recalls were partly caused by the company’s overly ambitious growth goals.
Executives had shrugged off last month’s recalls as coming from products made before stricter quality controls kicked in following the soul-searching that came after the recall scandal in the US
But the latest recall underlines how quality problems continue to dog Toyota, especially as it has gone back to pursuing aggressive growth.
Toyota is now headed to record vehicle sales around the world, offsetting a sales plunge in China with booming demand in emerging markets such as Indonesia, India and Thailand.


Airbus warns could leave Britain if no Brexit deal

Updated 22 June 2018
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Airbus warns could leave Britain if no Brexit deal

  • Industry analysts say Airbus would be unlikely to pull out of the UK abruptly because of long lead times and waiting lists for its planes
  • Airbus, which makes wings for all its passenger jets in the UK, said that leaving both the EU’s single market and customs union immediately

PARIS: European aviation giant Airbus warned Thursday it could be forced to pull out of the UK if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal.
In a Brexit risk assessment, Airbus said Britain withdrawing from the EU without a deal “would lead to severe disruption and interruption of UK production.”
“This scenario would force Airbus to reconsider its investments in the UK, and its long-term footprint in the country, severely undermining UK efforts to keep a competitive and innovative aerospace industry, developing high value jobs and competences,” it warned.
“Put simply, a no deal scenario directly threatens Airbus’ future in the UK,” Tom Williams, chief operating officer of Airbus Commercial Aircraft, said in a statement.
In its risk assessment, Airbus said under a “no deal” scenario, delays and disruptions to its production could cost it up to one billion euros ($1.2 billion) a week in lost turnover.
It said a no-deal Brexit “would be catastrophic” for the aviation group.
Airbus employs 14,000 people at more than 25 sites in Britain, where it manufactures the wings of its aircraft.
“In any scenario, Brexit has severe negative consequences for the UK aerospace industry and Airbus in particular,” Williams said.
“While Airbus understands that the political process must go on, as a responsible business we require immediate details on the pragmatic steps that should be taken to operate competitively,” he said.
“Without these, Airbus believes that the impacts on our UK operations could be significant. We have sought to highlight our concerns over the past 12 months, without success.”
On the future trade relationship between Britain and the EU, Airbus said the current transition period, which runs until December 2020, “is too short for the EU and UK Governments to agree the outstanding issues, and too short for Airbus to implement the required changes with its extensive supply chain.”
“In this scenario, Airbus would carefully monitor any new investments in the UK and refrain from extending the UK suppliers/partners base.”
Britain is due to leave the European Union in March 2019 but continue the current trading arrangements during the transition phase to December 2020 to give time for the two sides to agree the terms of a new partnership.