Tribal fighting in Darfur leaves 60 dead

Updated 24 February 2013
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Tribal fighting in Darfur leaves 60 dead

KHARTOUM, Sudan: Sudan’s state news agency says 60 people were killed in renewed fighting between two Arab tribes over mining rights in the northern Darfur region.
The United Nations says fighting broke out last month in the Jebel Amir area, leaving 100 dead in January and forcing 70,000 people to flee their homes.
The state news agency said the fighting Saturday was the worst since a cease-fire agreement was reached last month. The agency said fighting began when a group of armed tribesmen in vehicles and riding camels attacked the El-Sireaf area in North Darfur.
Sudan’s western region of Darfur has been afflicted by violence since 2003, when rebels took up arms against the central government in Khartoum. Fighting between government forces and among tribes breaks out periodically in the area.


Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

Updated 48 min 15 sec ago
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Mueller Report: Russia did attempt to meddle in 2016 US election, no evidence of US coordination

WASHINGTON: US Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday that the Mueller Report confirms the Russian government sought to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election, but that no evidence was found that any American conspired or coordinated with the Russian government.

While Mueller drew no conclusion about whether President Donald Trump had obstructed justice in the investigation, Barr said he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein personally had concluded that while Trump was "frustrated and angry" about the Mueller probe, nothing the president did rose to the level of an "obstruction-of-justice offense," Barr said

Mueller's report examined 10 episodes pertaining to Trump and obstruction.

Barr said the president did not exert executive privilege to withhold anything in the report. And he said the president's personal attorney had requested and gotten a chance to review the report before its public release.

The Justice Department was to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report later Thursday on Russian election interference and the Trump campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country.