Trout, Harper voted Rookies of the Year

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Updated 14 November 2012
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Trout, Harper voted Rookies of the Year

NEW YORK: Mike Trout and Bryce Harper were teammates on the Scottsdale Scorpions last fall. The outfielders arrived in the major leagues on the same April day this year, both played in the All-Star game and they won Rookie of the Year awards a half-hour apart Monday, the vanguard of baseball’s next generation.
The 21-year-old Trout was a unanimous pick as the youngest AL rookie winner, and the 20-year-old Harper edged Arizona pitcher Wade Miley 112 points to 105 to become the second-youngest winner of the NL honor.
“It’s pretty neat,” said Trout, the son of former Minnesota minor leaguer Jeff Trout.
For the first time, players learned the voting results when they were announced on television.
“My heart was beating a little bit,” Harper said.
Trout, who turned 21 on Aug. 7, received all 28 first-place votes from the AL panel of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America. The Los Angeles Angels center fielder was the eighth unanimous AL pick and the first since Tampa Bay’s Evan Longoria in 2008.
There could be more to come, too. Trout is among five finalists for AL MVP and is considered the chief challenger to Triple Crown winner Miguel Cabrera for that award, which will be announced Thursday.
“It would just top it off,” Trout said.
Trout hit .326, second-best in the league to Cabrera’s .330, with 30 homers and 83 RBIs, and he led the majors with 129 runs and 49 steals. He joined Ted Williams, Mel Ott and Alex Rodriguez as the only players to hit .320 or higher with 30 or more homers in seasons they started as a 20-year-old.
Trout received the maximum 140 points. Oakland outfielder Yoenis Cespedes was second with 63, followed by Texas pitcher Yu Darvish (46), who joined Trout as the only players listed on every ballot.
Detroit second baseman Lou Whitaker had been the youngest AL winner in 1978, but he was 3 months, 5 days older than Trout on the day he took home the award.
In addition to Trout and Longoria, the only other unanimous AL winners were Nomar Garciaparra, Derek Jeter, Tim Salmon, Sandy Alomar Jr., Mark McGwire and Carlton Fisk.
Trout’s father made it to Double-A as an infielder with the Twins in the mid-1980s and watched his son build a career growing up in New Jersey, where the seasons are short and cold.
“He went out and did it and endured it,” Jeff Trout said.
Added mom Debbie: “All the hard work paid off.”
Trout, taken by the Angels with the 25th overall pick in the 2009 amateur draft, still lives at home with his parents during the offseason. The award will join others in the family house.
“He gets a lot of good home cooking,” Jeff Trout said.
Trout spent some time in the majors last year but still retained his rookie status. He began this season in the minors and made his first big league appearance this year on April 28 — the day of Harper’s major league debut.
Trout was on a flight from Salt Lake City to Cleveland when he saw on Twitter that Harper was being called up the same day.
Harper turned 20 on Oct. 16 and has been hyped for years. When he was just 16, he appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated with the headline “CHOSEN ONE.”
“He’s been put on the spotlight since he was 15 years old,” Trout said.
The Washington Nationals outfielder got 16 of 32 first-place votes from the NL panel. Miley was second with 12 first-place votes, followed by Cincinnati slugger Todd Frazier with three firsts and 45 points. Harper appeared on every ballot, and Bill Center of U-T San Diego was the only voter who didn’t include Miley.
Harper was the top pick in the 2010 amateur draft and batted .270 with 22 home runs and 59 RBIs as Washington brought postseason play to the nation’s capital for the first time since 1933. Only Tony Conigliaro (24) hit more home runs as a teenager.
“Every little kid’s dream is to be a big league ballplayer or a doctor or a firefighter or whatever everybody wants to be,” Harper said. “That was my dream and I wanted to make that dream come true as quickly as possible.” At 20 years, 27 days on Monday, he was 24 days older than New York Mets pitcher Dwight Gooden when he won the NL award in 1984.
“This game is unbelievable. I love it with everything I’ve got,” Harper said, “and I’m going to play every single day like it’s my last.”
And the admiration of Harper and Trout is mutual, especially after their time together last year with Scottsdale in the Arizona Fall League, for the game’s premier prospects.






“He’s one of the best players in baseball, if not the best right now,” Harper said. “He’s pretty impressive every day he plays.”


Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge wins men’s race at London Marathon, Mo Farah third

Updated 22 April 2018
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Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge wins men’s race at London Marathon, Mo Farah third

  • Victory marks Eliud Kipchoge's third victory in the London Marathon
  • Home favorite Mo Farah has to settle for third

London: Eliud Kipchoge stormed to his third London Marathon title on Sunday to complete an impressive Kenyan double after Vivian Cheruiyot dominated the women's race in warm conditions.
Kipchoge, 33, saw off the challenge of Ethiopia's Tola Shura Kitata and home favorite Mo Farah to win his third London marathon in four years in a time of 2 hrs 4 min 27 sec, finishing more than half a minute in front of Kitata (2:05:00), with Farah third (2:06:32).
Cheruiyot, 34, timed her run perfectly to win the women's event in a time of 2 hours 18 min 31 secs ahead of compatriot Brigid Kosgei (2:20:13), and Ethiopia's Tadelech Bekele (2:21:40).
She took advantage of failed attempts to break Paula Radcliffe's 15-year-old world record by last year's winner Mary Keitany and runner-up Tirunesh Dibaba.
In unusually warm conditions in the British capital first Dibaba and then Keitany dropped off the pace, allowing the 2016 Olympic 5,000m gold medallist to claim victory.
After nine miles Keitany and main rival Dibaba were 25 seconds ahead of Radcliffe's time. But Dibaba was soon reduced to a walking pace to leave Keitany with only her two male pacemakers for company.
Keitany, looking for a fourth win in London, also started to slow down as it became apparent Radcliffe's record of two hours 15 minutes 25 seconds would not be threatened.
Britain's David Weir won the men's wheelchair race for the eighth time after a thrilling sprint finish.
The 38-year-old pipped Switzerland's Marcel Hug into second place, with Daniel Romanchuk of the United States third.