Tunisia uncovers Al-Qaeda network

Updated 17 December 2012
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Tunisia uncovers Al-Qaeda network

TUNIS: Tunisian security forces have broken up a network that recruited fighters for Al-Qaeda in North Africa, the Interior Ministry said on Saturday.
“A terrorist network which was responsible for recruiting radical militants and sending them to strongholds of Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) has been dismantled,” a ministry spokesman said, quoted by the official TAP news agency. Seven people were arrested and were to appear in court on Thursday.
Two of them, detained one kilometre (0.62 miles) from the border with Algeria on Dec. 6, confessed to being part of the network. The rest were arrested in the days that followed, and a gun was seized from one of them.
Other members of the network were being sought in the region of Jendouba, in northwestern Tunisia.
Security forces were also hunting for gunmen who killed a policeman near the Algerian border on Monday, spokesman added.
Clashes, strikes and attacks by hardline militants have multiplied across Tunisia in the run-up to the second anniversary of the start of Tunisia's revolution, which will be marked today.


Transition government, elections to follow weapons decommissioning: New UN envoy's road map for Yemen

Updated 39 min 39 sec ago
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Transition government, elections to follow weapons decommissioning: New UN envoy's road map for Yemen

  • Martin Griffith the UN special envoy to Yemen hopes to float a new blueprint
  • Yemen's foreign minister said he will work with Houthis as long as weapons are decommissioned

LONDON: The UN special envoy to Yemen has returned to the country armed with a new political settlement to end the ongoing war.

Sources were quoted by Al Sharq Al-Awsat that Martin Griffith the UN special envoy to Yemen hopes to float a new-old blueprint to end the war by getting the parties to agree to a political settlement based on a transitional period to be followed by elections if both parties to the conflict agree to his plan.

Griffith hopes to start political talks without addressing the armed groups and their weapons, in the hope of addressing this sensitive issue later.

The proposed talks center around a negotiation process between a legitimate government and the proponent of the coup carried out by the Houthi militia backed by Iran in September 2015.

Yemen’s foreign minister Andel Malek Al-Mekhlafi said that his government is willing to work with the Houthis in a unity government in a transitional phase, as long as weapons are decommissioned; “so that we don’t legitimize the coup and its gains,” Al-Mekhlafi said.

While Yemen awaits practical steps to apply the UN special envoy’s vision, many experts in Yemen question the Houthi militia’s intent and commitment to any political settlement, with many believing that they will wait for orders from the Iranian government.