US politician defends North Korea trip with Google head

Updated 04 January 2013
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US politician defends North Korea trip with Google head

WASHINGTON: Former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson dismissed US government concerns over his planned trip to North Korea with Google chairman Eric Schmidt, in an interview on Friday.
“I know the State Department is a little nervous,” Richardson said on CBS This Morning, “but we did postpone this trip already.
“Eric and I were going in December, and at the request of the State Department, we postponed it because of the South Korean presidential elections.
“We’re not representing the State Department, so they shouldn’t be that nervous,” he insisted, saying that the men were planning a private mission to urge the release of a US citizen held in North Korea.
The United States on Thursday criticized the visit, saying it was ill-timed in the wake of Pyongyang’s widely condemned rocket launch last month.
But Richardson said the visit was linked to North Korea’s arrest and planned prosecution of a US citizen of Korean descent, Kenneth Bae.
“I heard from his son, who wants to get him released,” Richardson said, highlighting his past efforts at negotiating with Pyongyang.
“I’ve brought back American servicemen. I’ve brought back American hostages. I’ve negotiated for the remains of our soldiers from the Korean War.”
The former governor said he had invited Schmidt to join the trip because “he’s interested in foreign policy, he’s a friend of mine, and I felt that it was important that there be a broader perspective of our visit.”
But he said Schmidt was going as a private citizen, and not as a representative of Internet giant Google.
Pyongyang has in the past agreed to hand over detainees to high-profile delegations led by the likes of former US president Bill Clinton, and some observers suggested it may have requested Schmidt’s participation in this case.
Richardson, a veteran troubleshooter on North Korea, also said he was “concerned about the nuclear proliferation of the North Koreans.”
“I think our trip is to make an assessment of the situation in North Korea,” said Richardson, who has not traveled to the isolated nation since its new leader, Kim Jong-Un, took over from his father.
“We can bring back a perspective and at the same time try to move the North Koreans in the right direction.”
Richardson was last in Pyongyang in 2010 when he met North Korea’s chief nuclear negotiator in an attempt to ease tensions after the North shelled a South Korean border island.
The US citizen arrested in November, identified as Pae Jun-Ho, entered the country as a tourist according to North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) which said he had admitted committing a crime against the state.


France charges two ex-spies with passing secrets to ‘foreign power’

Updated 9 min 33 sec ago
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France charges two ex-spies with passing secrets to ‘foreign power’

  • Two former French spies, one of whom was reportedly posted in Beijing, have been charged with passing intelligence to a “foreign power,”
  • French media reports, citing sources close to the inquiry, said China is suspected

PARIS: Two former French spies, one of whom was reportedly posted in Beijing, have been charged with passing intelligence to a “foreign power,” a disclosure that has rocked the country’s intelligence services.
Defense Minister Florence Parly, who oversees the country’s General Directorate for External Security (DGSE), said Friday that she was not in a position to identify the country which recruited the agents, who were discovered and indicted in December.
“Two French agents in our service and probably one of the spouses of these agents are accused of serious acts likely to be considered acts of treason, on suspicions of delivering information to a foreign power,” Parly told CNews television.
“I can’t say much else,” she added.
“France has partners but we live in a dangerous world, and unfortunately these types of things can happen.”
French media reports, citing sources close to the inquiry, said China is suspected.
Parly said the agents were “quite likely” still in service at the time but investigators were still determining how long they had been passing along intelligence.
She also declined to specify the nature of compromised information, nor to reveal if the two agents were working together.
A judicial source told AFP late Thursday that two of the three suspects are being prosecuted for “delivering to a foreign power information that undermines the fundamental interests of the nation” and “compromising the secrecy of national defense.”
“One of them has also been charged for direct incitement to the crime of treason,” the source added.
The third person — believed to be the wife — has been indicted for “concealment of treasonable crimes” and placed under judicial control, meaning they are subject to certain constraints pending trial, according to the same source.
The armed forces ministry said: “These acts of extreme gravity have been detected by this service, which has brought these facts to its knowledge to the Paris prosecutor.”