Uzbekistan 'cuts off gas' to Tajikistan

Updated 01 January 2013
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Uzbekistan 'cuts off gas' to Tajikistan

DUSHANBE, Tajikistan: The impoverished Central Asian state of Tajikistan said yesterday that it had been cut off from natural gas shipments by its neighbor and sole energy supplier Uzbekistan.
The announcement comes amid traditional end-of-year contract negotiations and continuing tensions over Tajikistan's plans to build a hydroelectric power station that could choke off Uzbek water supplies.
"We have stopped receiving gas from Uzbekistan," a spokesman for the Tajiktransgas state gas company told AFP. "The supplies have been cut."
Energy power Uzbekistan last halted gas shipments to Tajikistan for two weeks in April.
Uzbekistan has been seeking to funnel its lucrative gas exports to new markets in China and has also curbed its shipments to Russia.
But Tajikistan — poorest of the ex-Soviet nations and still recovering from a 1990s civil war — has few other energy sources and suffers from chronic electricity shortages.
The nation of 7.5 million is now moving ahead with plans for a Rogun Dam project that would tap into the mountain country's abundant water resources.
Uzbekistan fears the dam could badly hurt its large cotton industry and become a national security threat.


Siemens CEO pushes plans to boost Iraqi power infrastructure

Updated 23 September 2018
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Siemens CEO pushes plans to boost Iraqi power infrastructure

FRANKFURT: Siemens said its boss Joe Kaeser met Iraq’s prime minister on Sunday to discuss a proposal by the German company to expand the Middle East nation’s power production.
The German engineering group said it was proposing a deal to add 11 gigawatt (GW) of capacity over four years, saying this would boost the country’s capacity by nearly 50 percent.
It did not give a value, but such a contract would be worth several billion euros based on previous comparable deals.
Iraq has a wide gap between electricity consumption and supply. Peak demand in the summer, when people turn on air conditioners due to high temperatures, is about 21 GW, far exceeding the 13 GW the grid is currently provides, experts say.
Kaeser said in a statement after meeting Prime Minister Al-Abadi that they had “discussed the comprehensive Siemens roadmap to build a better future for the Iraqi people.”
“In Egypt, we have done the same and successfully built up the power infrastructure in record time with the highest efficiency,” he said.
In 2015, Siemens signed an 8 billion euro ($9.4 billion) deal with Egypt to supply gas and wind power plants to add 16.4 gigawatts of capacity to the country’s power grid, marking the group’s single biggest order.
The proposal for Iraq, first pitched in February, would include cutting Iraq’s energy losses, introducing smart grids, expanding transmission grids, upgrading existing plants and adding new capacity.
The group would also help the government secure funding from international commercial banks and export credit agencies with German government support, creating thousands of jobs in Iraq.
Siemens would donate a $60 million grant for software for Iraqi universities, it said.