Visa violators face punitive action

Updated 07 October 2012
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Visa violators face punitive action

JEDDAH: The Shoura Council yesterday passed a law banning expatriates from working for companies and individuals other than their employers or sponsors.
Punitive action would be taken against Saudi sponsors and companies who allow foreigners to work for other employers, the new law said.
The Shoura also passed a draft law that incriminates those who employ visa violators or leave their employees to work on their own or for others or use the workers of other sponsors. Violators face jail sentences not more than five years.
The Shoura decisions augur well with the Labor Ministry’s efforts to regulate job market and create more employment opportunities for Saudis. It also supports the government’s move to crack down on coverup businesses.
The consultative body approved a draft law with 14 articles to deal with expatriates who violate the Kingdom’s regulations including those who overstay Haj and Umrah visas.
“Security agencies shall arrest those who employ expatriates who violate Saudi law as well as those who allow their employees to work for their personal accounts,” the new law said.
According to the draft law, police can arrest those who hide, shelter or transport violators or provide them with any form of assistance as well as those who did not inform authorities about the delay in departure of people whom they brought. “The violators who came on Haj, Umrah and visit visas (and working for individuals and companies) would be deported at the expense of those who employ them,” the law said.
According to the amended Article 39 of the Saudi Labor Law, “An employer is not allowed to leave his employee to work for others, while an employee is not allowed to work for another employer, without following the necessary procedures.”
The Labor Ministry inspectors shall visit companies and institutions to find out violators of the law and hand them over to the Interior Ministry for action. The Shoura agreed to abolish Article 233 of the Labor Law that includes punishment to those who violate Article 39.
 


Gibraltar court extends detention of Iranian tanker for 30 days

Updated 2 min 23 sec ago
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Gibraltar court extends detention of Iranian tanker for 30 days

  • The Grace 1 was intercepted by British Royal Marines and Gibraltar’s police on July 4
  • Supertanker was believed destined for Syria to deliver oil
GIBRALTAR: Gibraltar’s Supreme Court ruled Friday that a seized Iranian tanker suspected of breaching sanctions by shipping oil to Syria can be detained for 30 more days, the British territory’s attorney general said.
The Grace 1 supertanker, carrying 2.1 million barrels of oil, was intercepted by British Royal Marines and Gibraltar’s police on July 4 as it transited through waters claimed by Gibraltar, which is located on Spain’s southern tip.
An initial order by the court authorizing the detention of the vessel would lapse after Friday. The order can be renewed for up to 90 days.
“We look forward to continuing to work constructively and positively with officials of the Islamic Republic of Iran to facilitate the release of the Grace 1 pursuant to the satisfaction of all legal requirements,” Gibraltar’s Chief Minister Fabian Picardo told the territory’s parliament.
Picardo said Thursday he had a “constructive and positive” meeting with Iranian officials in London aimed at defusing tensions around the detention of the tanker in the British territory’s waters.
Gibraltar and US officials believed the tanker was destined for Syria to deliver oil, in violation of separate sets of EU and US sanctions.
Iran has reacted with fury to what it termed “piracy” and warned it would not let the interception go unanswered.
Last week, a British warship in the Gulf warned off armed Iranian boats that tried to stop a UK supertanker. London has since announced the deployment of two more warships to the Gulf region for the coming months.
The Gibraltar court ruling comes as tensions in the Gulf region mounted Friday after Washington said an Iranian drone was destroyed after threatening an American naval vessel at the entrance to the Strait of Hormuz.
It was believed to be the first US military engagement with Iran following a series of increasingly serious incidents.
Iran denied losing any drones.