Wired Green: The realignment of sustainable ICT

Updated 19 November 2012
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Wired Green: The realignment of sustainable ICT

The rapid economic development seen within the Gulf over recent years has been mirrored by a historic surge in more advanced ICT infrastructure connecting people and businesses across the region. The cost of powering these information highways has however, proven to be no small feat, with the ICT sector now emerging as one of the most important forefronts where a region-wide overhaul of sustainable and eco-friendly infrastructure can be realized.
The fact is that services like broadband Internet, office data management, and Web 2.0 tools constitute a massive amount of information exchange every minute of every day. In countries such as UAE & KSA, large-scale infrastructure deployments led by new fiber networks and wireless 4G technologies have further resulted in a deluge of information that threatens to submerge service providers and customers in the red. Energy costs are one of the primary feeders of this crimson tide. For businesses and consumers alike, these can result in more frequent network delays, higher prices for voice and data connectivity, and a greater environmental toll on local communities.
According to industry authorities, electricity consumption and carbon emissions related to ICT activities account for close to 6 percent and 2 percent of the aggregate worldwide. This becomes particularly worrisome as groups like the International Energy Agency have predicted a dramatic energy surge within the GCC, where demand for electrical power alone is expected to triple over the next 25 years.
Yet what decisions need to be taken today by service providers to reduce their networks’ power consumption and operating costs? What are the realistic benefits, and how can ICT be used to accrue savings in other sectors such as transportation, manufacturing, and so on?
The ICT Carbon Footprint
While ICTs can support local governments and businesses to reduce their carbon footprint, the responsibility of tech leaders goes far beyond the greening of other enterprises. The first step must start internally.
Global consultants Gartner have estimated that ICTs account for roughly 2 percent of all global carbon emissions, with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) echoing the contribution of ICTs to “climate change” at roughly 2 percent. Some of the main contributors within the sector’s portfolio include the energy requirements of ultra-fast servers, massive data centers, and telecom base stations needed for wireless communications. Complex telecommunication networks being rolled out today also require an “always on” system of PCs, equipment cooling devices, modems and ubiquitous mobile devices. It’s a lot of energy to say the least.
All of this translates to more storage and processing, which in turn means higher operating costs. The good news is that recent technology innovations allow local businesses from literally any vertical to make more efficient use of ICTs by doing more with less.
Vertical
Lessons
According to the report SMART 2020 published by the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), ICTs will enable other sectors of the society to achieve significant emissions reductions over the next decade, helping businesses avoid an estimated 15 percent of predicted total global emissions - or five times ICT’s own footprint. Recent product updates have also led to declining energy consumption per ICT unit, with telecom operators alone now able to save more than 50 percent on their previous energy demand.
Regardless of the sector or size of the enterprise, we have seen three opportunities surge to the top of regional dialogue as priorities in making “green” networking a more viable business model:
Lifecycle
Management
The biggest challenge locally is that for governments and large corporations being squeezed for budget, non-green ICT options are still often the easiest and cheapest to deploy-initially. But new Lifecycle Analysis (LCA) tools are changing the game as cost saving can be tied to energy efficiency throughout the entire process of product planning, delivery and maintenance. In the Middle East such tools are still relatively young, but are quickly becoming more thorough and helping many organizations to identify and cap their biggest energy drains.
The Employees Challenge & Solution
All organizations are unique in how IT operations are managed within their existing infrastructure-there really is no one-size-fits-all model. With that said, many of those most successful in implementing sustainable ICT solutions have done so by involving their entire workforce around this call to action. A number of organizations today have done this successfully by setting up sustainability governance teams that work above IT support (and in alliance with procurement) in order to identify and sell “green” on the strategy level.
Continued Optimization
One of the issues most often faced in this region even after organizations go green is the comprehensive collection of data before and during the roll out of ICT solutions. Regulatory policies are often fragmented and disjointed, so companies often have little legal responsibilities in this area. The issue then comes when project managers are left empty handed when demonstrating how new green alternatives are a superior choice to legacy systems. While such reports are often not mandated, there are a host of new instruments tailored to the local environment that enterprises can use to monitor network stability, power consumption and system performance to ensure that solutions are not just established, but optimized for the long-term benefit of the organization.
Getting Down to Business
In a regional ICT market that analysts predict could be worth more than $ 170 billion by 2015, perhaps the “green gap” is that in addition to having the right mind set, applying the right technical solutions is equally important. Earlier this year Dr. Bilel Jamoussi, chief of the Study Groups Department at the ITU, noted awareness as “the biggest obstacle” to a genuine move toward sustainability in the ICT field. Being an enabler technology, the United Nations has further stressed that the ICT industry is ready to deliver energy savings in a way that also drives economic growth.

By further examining the relationship between ICTs and energy costs-especially on the country level-the industry will be able to take bolder corrective actions while continuing to reveal opportunities for those outside the sector to view “green” as a revenue source rather than just an environmental consideration.

— Yi Xiang is president of Huawei Middle East.


Brent crude oil rises for a sixth day as supplies tighten amid strong demand

Updated 25 min 42 sec ago
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Brent crude oil rises for a sixth day as supplies tighten amid strong demand

  • US West Texas Intermediate crude futures were at $68.98 a barrel, up 34 cents
  • The potential of renewed US sanctions against Iran is pushing prices higher

SINGAPORE: Brent crude oil rose for sixth day on Tuesday, passing $75 a barrel, on expectations that supplies will tighten because fuel is rising at the same time the US may impose sanctions against Iran and OPEC-led output cuts remain in place.
Brent crude oil futures climbed to as high as $75.20 a barrel in early trading on Tuesday, the highest since Nov. 27, 2014. Brent was still at $75 a barrel at 0311 GMT up 29 cents, or 0.4 percent, from its last close.
Brent’s six-day rising streak is the most since a similar string of gains in December and it is up by more than 20 percent from its 2018 low in February.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $68.98 a barrel, up 34 cents, or 0.5 percent from their last settlement. On Thursday, WTI rose to as high as $69.56, the most since Nov. 28, 2014.
Markets have been lifted by supply cuts led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) which were introduced in 2017 with the aim of propping up the market.
The potential of renewed US sanctions against Iran is also pushing prices higher.
Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia/Pacific at futures brokerage OANDA said new sanctions against Tehran “could push oil prices up as much as $5 per barrel.”
The US has until May 12 to decide whether it will leave the Iran nuclear deal and re-impose sanctions against OPEC’s third-largest producer, which would further tighten global supplies.
“Crude prices are now sitting at the highest levels in three years, reflecting ongoing concerns around geopolitical tensions in the Middle East, which is the source of nearly half of the world’s oil supply,” ANZ bank said.
“Oil strength is coming from Saudi Arabia’s recent commitment to get oil back up to between $70 to $80 per barrel as well as inventory levels that are back in the normal range,” said William O’Loughlin, investment analyst at Australia’s Rivkin Securities.
OPEC’s supply curtailments and the threat of new sanctions are occurring just as demand in Asia, the world’s biggest oil consuming region, has risen to a record as new and expanded refineries start up from China to Vietnam.
One of the few factors that has limited oil prices from surging even more is US production, which has shot up by more than a quarter since mid-2016 to over 10.54 million barrels per day (bpd), taking it past Saudi Arabia’s output of around 10 million bpd.
As a result of its rising output, US crude is increasingly appearing on global markets, from Europe to Asia, undermining OPEC’s efforts to tighten the market.