Cameron: I don’t want a country called Europe

Updated 25 January 2013
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Cameron: I don’t want a country called Europe

DAVOS, Switzerland: Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron has slammed any moves to forge a United States of Europe.
Cameron, who has shaken up Europe’s political landscape by offering to let citizens vote on whether to leave the 27-nation European Union, says forcing countries into a single entity would be a “great mistake.”
Speaking on Thursday at the World Economic Forum in the Swiss resort of Davos, Cameron says Britain would stand against any moves to shoehorn countries into a centralized political union.
Many politicians, particularly those in the 17 countries that use the euro, think closer political ties are needed. Some even think something resembling the United States should be Europe’s end-game.
Following Cameron’s pledge to hold a referendum on EU membership, the leaders of Ireland, Italy and The Netherlands were one in saying Britain would be better off staying in the Union.
Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte warned that outside the 27-member bloc Britain would be “an island somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, somewhere between the United States and Europe.”
“It would not be connected with either of these two, so I think it’s vital for us all that they stay in,” added Rutte.
Cameron’s promise to hold a public vote on whether Britain should remain part of the European Union has somewhat hijacked the agenda in Davos, previously expected to consider ways out of the three-year economic crisis.
Addressing the world’s top business and political elite earlier, Cameron denied Britain planned to “turn our backs” on Europe and Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said the EU as a union would be more powerful with London still involved.
“The EU will continue to be stronger if Britain is part of it,” he said on the same panel. “Whatever happens, I would like to see that Britain would remain central to the European Union. It’s very important in the global sense.”
Kenny, whose country currently holds the EU’s rotating presidency, also stressed that “five years is an eternity” in politics and urged Europe to use the relative calm on the financial markets to push forward reforms to bolster its economy.
Cameron pledged to hold the referendum by the end of 2017 if re-elected.
“What you need now is clarity,” Kenny said, adding that Ireland had held referendums on several European issues in the past 40 years, with a “positive” response every time.
Italy’s Prime Minister Mario Monti said he was confident the British people would choose to continue their tricky relationship with Brussels, because turning their back on the EU would mean losing several economic advantages.
“I believe that when the moment comes, the UK people will say ‘yes’ because... if they say ‘no’, they would have to get out of the single market,” said Monti.
Whereas last year’s meeting of the World Economic Forum was dominated by talk of Greece leaving the eurozone, the leaders agreed the bloc would now stay together, but Rutte surprised some by calling for an exit mechanism.
“I believe our aim should be to have the whole eurozone intact,” said the prime minister.
“At the same time, you can never predict whether at one stage a country would want to leave the eurozone and I think it should be possible,” he added.
And he clashed with Kenny on whether the EU needed to change its founding treaties to include some of the far-reaching reforms agreed during the three-year debt crisis that has pitched the eurozone into recession.
Rutte said that treaty change was necessary “in the medium-term” but Kenny stressed: “There is no opportunity now for re-opening negotiations about treaty changes.”
The Dutch prime minister also complained that too many tasks were being dealt with at a European level — he cited the example of health and safety legislation — and that it was difficult to bring powers back to home parliaments from Brussels.
“In terms of rules and legislation, it’s a bit like ‘Hotel California’, you can check out but you can never leave,” he said.
“You can never repatriate tasks to the national level.”


Police smash rings that smuggled Moroccan minors into Spain

Updated 23 June 2018
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Police smash rings that smuggled Moroccan minors into Spain

  • One gang allegedly charged about €2,000 to smuggle a minor by boat from Morocco, a price that would rise to up to €8,000 if weather conditions were bad.
  • The group charged €5,000 to bring minors across on a jet ski and €2,500 hidden inside trucks on ferries. It is suspected of having smuggled over 100 migrants into Spain from Morocco.

MADRID: Police have broken up two gangs suspected of smuggling minors from Morocco into Spain on jet skis, boats or hidden inside trucks, charging thousands of euros for the crossing, Spanish police and Europol said Friday.
One gang allegedly charged about €2,000 ($2,300) to smuggle a minor by boat from Morocco, a price that would rise to up to €8,000 if weather conditions were bad, Spanish police said in a statement.
The group charged €5,000 to bring minors across on a jet ski and €2,500 hidden inside trucks on ferries. It is suspected of having smuggled over 100 migrants into Spain from Morocco.
Spanish police said they had broken up the group with the arrest of 22 people across the country, including three employees of a youth detention center in the northern region of Asturias suspected of helping the minors get documents to be able to live in Spain legally.
The authorities said they began their investigation after detecting a significant rise in the arrival of unaccompanied minors from Morocco at this youth detention center, who were all mainly from the same area near the Sahara desert.
During a second phase police broke up another gang linked to the first group which smuggled minors from Morocco to Spain by boat, but which also kidnapped minors who were brought in by rival groups and held them for ransom in forests or safe houses in the southern province of Cadiz.
“The criminal gang collected money by extorting the minors’ families in Morocco, sometimes using violence and threats, until they paid a ransom of €500 to release the children,” Europol, which worked with Spanish police on the operation, said in a statement.
Spanish police said they had smashed this second group with the arrest of six of its members.
The Strait of Gibraltar separates Spain and Morocco by around just 15 kilometers (nine miles) — a ferry ride between the two continents takes roughly 40 minutes — making it one of the key smuggling routes for illegal immigrants crossing into Europe.
Spain is the third busiest gateway for migrants arriving in Europe, still far behind Italy but catching up fast with Greece.
According to the International Organization for Migration, more than 22,400 people arrived in Spain by sea last year, nearly triple the number for 2016. Some 223 people died along the way.