Storm kills 20 in eastern India; Kashmir floods toll rises to 16

Updated 31 March 2015
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Storm kills 20 in eastern India; Kashmir floods toll rises to 16

SRINAGAR: In eastern India, the Bihar state government said at least 20 people were killed when heavy downpours and lightning struck parts of the state late Monday. Strong winds uprooted trees and many houses collapsed in the state capital, Patna, and in Purnia and Katihar districts, it said in a statement.
In the Himalayan region of Kashmir, rescuers recovered 16 bodies Tuesday from two houses hit by rain-triggered landslides, following its second major floods in six months.
Elsewhere in India, fierce rain and lightning toppled houses and trees in Bihar state, killing 20 others.
Police and volunteers worked around the clock to clear the debris in Laden village in Kashmir’s Budgam district, police Superintendent Fayaz Ahmed said.
Floodwaters were receding in Kashmir, but residents of the main city of Srinagar were bracing for more trouble after predictions of additional rain in the next few days. Rains over the weekend were the worst since the region was hit by devastating floods last September that destroyed thousands of homes and $17 billion worth of infrastructure.
Many rivers in Kashmir were above their danger levels. Hundreds of people were staying in relief camps after the state government ordered them to leave low-lying areas.
Many faulted the government for failing to anticipate last year’s flooding and taking too long to respond. Prime Minister Narendra Modi dispatched a special team on Monday to assess the needs from the current floods and get relief efforts moving.
On the Pakistani side of the border, which was hit worse by last year’s flooding, authorities said the situation was improving, although the Neelum and Jhelum Rivers were perilously close to overflowing their banks.
“Both the rivers are still swollen,” said Akram Sohail, an official with the government disaster management department in the Pakistan-controlled portion of Kashmir.


FBI warns Russians hacked hundreds of thousands of routers

Updated 25 May 2018
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FBI warns Russians hacked hundreds of thousands of routers

WASHINGTON: The FBI warned on Friday that Russian computer hackers had compromised hundreds of thousands of home and office routers and could collect user information or shut down network traffic.
The US law enforcement agency urged the owners of many brands of routers to turn them off and on again and download updates from the manufacturer to protect themselves.
The warning followed a court order Wednesday that allowed the FBI to seize a website that the hackers planned to use to give instructions to the routers. Though that cut off malicious communications, it still left the routers infected, and Friday’s warning was aimed at cleaning up those machines.
Infections were detected in more than 50 countries, though the primary target for further actions was probably Ukraine, the site of many recent infections and a longtime cyberwarfare battleground.
In obtaining the court order, the Justice Department said the hackers involved were in a group called Sofacy that answered to the Russian government.
Sofacy, also known as APT28 and Fancy Bear, has been blamed for many of the most dramatic Russian hacks, including that of the Democratic National Committee during the 2016 US presidential campaign.
Earlier, Cisco Systems Inc. said the hacking campaign targeted devices from Belkin International’s Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear Inc, TP-Link and QNAP.
Cisco shared the technical details of its investigation with the US and Ukrainian governments. Western experts say Russia has conducted a series of attacks against companies in Ukraine for more than a year amid armed hostilities between the two countries, causing hundreds of millions of dollars in damages and at least one electricity blackout.
The Kremlin on Thursday denied the Ukrainian government’s accusation that Russia was planning a cyberattack on Ukrainian state bodies and private companies ahead of the Champions League soccer final in Kiev on Saturday.
“The size and scope of the infrastructure by VPNFilter malware is significant,” the FBI said, adding that it is capable of rendering peoples’ routers “inoperable.”
It said the malware is hard to detect, due to encryption and other tactics.
The FBI urged people to reboot their devices to temporarily disrupt the malware and help identify infected devices.
People should also consider disabling remote-management settings, changing passwords and upgrading to the latest firmware.