Seas could rise 6 meters even if govts curb warming

Updated 10 July 2015
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Seas could rise 6 meters even if govts curb warming

OSLO: Sea levels could rise by at least six meters in the long term, swamping coasts from Florida to Bangladesh, even if governments achieve their goals for curbing global warming, according to a study published on Thursday.
Tracts of ice in Greenland and Antarctica melted when temperatures were around or slightly higher than today in ancient thaws in the past three million years, a US-led international team wrote in the journal Science.
And the world may be headed for a repeat even if governments cut greenhouse gas emissions to limit global warming to a United Nations goal of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times.
“Present temperature targets may commit Earth to at least six metres sea level rise,” the authors at the Past Global Changes project wrote. Some greenhouse gases can linger for centuries in the atmosphere.
Such a thaw would threaten cities from Beijing to London, and swamp low-lying tropical island states.
Lead author Andrea Dutton, of the University of Florida, said it could take many centuries for a six-meter rise, despite some ancient evidence that more rapid shifts were possible.
“This is a long-term projection. It’s not going to happen the day after tomorrow,” she told Reuters.
The United Nations’ panel of climate scientists said in 2013 that global warming could push up world sea levels by 26 to 82 cm (10 to 32 inches) by the late 21st century, on top of a 19 cm gain since 1900. Thursday’s study, based on studies of everything from ancient ice to fossil corals, said sea levels rose by between six and nine metres in a warm period about 125,000 years ago when temperatures were similar to those of today.
Ocean levels gained between six and 13 metres 400,000 years ago when temperatures were up to about 1C warmer than present.
And in a warm period three million years ago, sea levels were also at least six metres higher than now. The ancient shifts were probably linked to natural variations in the Earth’s orbit around the sun.


Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

Updated 9 min 55 sec ago
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Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

  • “From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS
  • But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said

WASHINGTON: Iran is adhering to its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal and the accord — repudiated by the United States — should stay in place, Britain’s prime minister said in an interview broadcast on Sunday.
“From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS.
“We believe that that should stay in place. And others, involved in putting that deal together believe that it should stay in place,” May said in excerpts of an interview shown on “Face the Nation” that was to air in full Monday on “This Morning.”
But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said.
“Looking at the issue of ballistic missiles. Looking at — the way in which — Iran is acting in the region — to destabilize the region. We need to address those issues,” May said.
May’s interview came as world leaders geared up for a week of high-stakes diplomacy at the UN General Assembly, which is set to be dominated by North Korea and Iran.
On Wednesday, President Donald Trump will for the first time chair a Security Council meeting on non-proliferation and weapons of mass destruction that will focus heavily on Iran — likely triggering a clash with other big powers.
Earlier this year, Trump pulled the US out of the deal it reached with Iran and five other countries in 2015. That accord lifted sanctions against Tehran in exchange for restrictions on its nuclear program.
Now, the US is reimposing those sanctions.
Other parties to the deal have argued that it is working and should stay in place, while the International Atomic Energy Agency has said Iran is complying with the accord.