Power restored in Pakistan after blackout

Updated 26 February 2013
0

Power restored in Pakistan after blackout

KARACHI: Pakistan’s Ministry of Water and Power announced yesterday that power was restored across the country, including Karachi and Quetta, following a widespread, countrywide breakdown on Sunday night. Power transmission was restored in Sindh and Karachi adding that the electricity issue in Karachi was from within the Karachi Electric Supply Corporation (KESC)’s own system and that the electricity crises in Karachi had no link with the national grid.
The Ministry of Water and Power has started its own inquiry into breakdown. The breakdown occurred at about 11:45pm on Sunday, cutting off power supply across almost the entire country.
Power was restored yesterday morning with electricity supply resuming in some parts of Karachi and Quetta as well as in other areas of the country. Secretary Water and Power Rai Sikandar said 5,000MW of electricity had reentered the system, enabling the restoration of electricity supply across Pakistan.
He said the breakdown was caused when the Hubco Power Plant tripped due to a technical failure and other power plants were shut down in order to prevent any damage to their respective systems, thus leaving more than half the country in darkness.
Another official, Masood Akhtar, said that power was restored to most parts of the country by midmorning and that a few remaining areas should get it back soon. Energy-starved Pakistan experiences daily power outages but complete breakdowns are rare.
Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf has also ordered an inquiry into the matter.


Zimbabwe applies to rejoin Commonwealth

Updated 38 min 42 sec ago
0

Zimbabwe applies to rejoin Commonwealth

  • Zimbabwe has applied to rejoin the Commonwealth, marking a major step in its international re-engagement after Robert Mugabe was ousted last year.
  • Britain said last month that it would strongly support Zimbabwe returning to the Commonwealth.

Harare, Zimbabwe: Zimbabwe has applied to rejoin the Commonwealth, the group said Monday, marking a major step in the country’s international re-engagement after Robert Mugabe was ousted last year.
Mugabe angrily pulled Zimbabwe out of the bloc of former British colonies in 2003 after its membership was suspended over violent and graft-ridden elections the previous year.
The Commonwealth said it had received a letter dated May 15 from Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa applying to re-join.
Member countries “very much look forward to Zimbabwe’s return when the conditions are right,” said Secretary-General Patricia Scotland in a statement from London.
“Zimbabwe’s eventual return to the Commonwealth, following a successful membership application, would be a momentous occasion.”
Scotland confirmed that the Commonwealth would send observers to elections due in July or August, the first polls since Mugabe was ousted in November after a brief military takeover.
Mugabe was replaced by his former deputy Mnangagwa, a veteran ruling ZANU-PF party loyalist who was backed by senior military officers.
Mnangagwa has vowed to hold fair and free elections, and has pledged to revive the moribund economy by repairing international ties and attracting foreign investment.
Scotland called for “a credible, peaceful and inclusive election that restores citizens’ confidence, trust and hope in the development and democratic trajectory of their country.”
Britain said last month that it would strongly support Zimbabwe returning to the Commonwealth.
Zimbabwe had fractured relations with the West under Mugabe, who had held power since independence from Britain in 1980.
The government in Harare was not immediately available to comment.
If readmitted, Zimbabwe will become the fifth country to re-join the voluntary association of mostly former territories of the British empire, after Gambia, South Africa, Pakistan and Fiji.
The Gambia re-joined the Commonwealth in February this year after the impoverished west African nation was in 2013 suddenly pulled out of the bloc by ex-president Yahya Jammeh.
The other countries to have quit the organization are Ireland, which left in 1949 and the Maldives which exited in 2016.
The Commonwealth brings together 53 countries representing 2.4 billion people, under a charter pledging commitment to democracy, human rights and rule of law.
The last country to join was Rwanda, in 2009.
The organization also holds an Olympics-style multi-sport event every four years, most recently in Australia’s Gold Coast in April.
Zimbabwe left the Commonwealth at the height of violent land seizures, when white farmers were evicted in favor of landless black people in a policy that wrecked the agriculture sector and triggered national economic collapse.