‘A prayer a day’ for Slovak politicians

Updated 04 January 2013

‘A prayer a day’ for Slovak politicians

BRATISLAVA: Disillusioned Slovaks are turning to the power of prayer in the hope of cleaning up politicians widely regarded as corrupt. More than 400 people have vowed to pray for the politician of their choice for at least five minutes a day for six months since the Internet initiative was launched on Tuesday. “Some people choose their favorite politician, while others might pray for their least favorite lawmaker in order to change their behavior,” a woman said. She declined to name the politicians who have mustered the most prayers so far.
Slovak politics were rocked to the core last year when a secret-service file code-named Gorilla leaked on the Internet revealed alleged links between oligarchs from a private financial group and nearly all of the country’s political elite.
The leak has inspired the rise of the Internet-fueled “anti-Gorilla” movement, attracting thousands to rallies in Slovakia’s capital Bratislava. But more than a year after the scandal erupted, police are still investigating and have yet to press charges.


Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.