Afghan officials met key Taleban figure in Pakistan

Updated 13 August 2012

Afghan officials met key Taleban figure in Pakistan

KABUL/ISLAMABAD: Afghan officials have held secret talks with the Taleban's former second in command who is in detention in Pakistan in a move which could help rekindle stalled peace talks with the insurgents, according to senior officials from both countries.
Afghan officials have often seen Pakistan as a reluctant partner in attempts to broker talks with the Taleban but its decision to grant access to Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar may signal Islamabad's willingness to play a more active role.
Rangin Spanta, the national security adviser to Afghan President Hamid Karzai and an architect of peace-building efforts, said an Afghan delegation had met Baradar in Pakistan two months ago.
Baradar has been in detention since he was captured in a joint operation by the CIA and Pakistani intelligence agents in the Pakistani city of Karachi in 2010.
“We have met Mullah Baradar,” Spanta told Reuters in Kabul. “Our delegation has spoken to him to know his view on peace talks.”
Afghan officials have publicly been demanding access to Baradar, the Taleban's top military commander until he was captured, but Spanta's revelation shows preliminary contact has already been made.
Rehman Malik, Pakistan's interior minister, also said that Pakistan had granted Afghan officials access to Baradar.
“They had access at the required and appropriate level,” Malik told Reuters. “We are fully cooperating with Afghanistan and whatever they are asking for the peace process, for developing peace in Afghanistan. We are giving every kind of help.”
Pakistan is seen as crucial to stability in Afghanistan as most foreign combat troops look to leave the country in 2014, given close political and economic ties and because militant sanctuaries straddle the mountainous border.
Baradar was the main day-to-day commander responsible for leading the Taleban campaign against US and NATO troops, plotting suicide bombings and other attacks.
He was the right-hand man to reclusive Taleban leader Mullah Muhammad Omar providing him with great influence and prestige in Taleban circles.
Afghan officials hope Baradar could play a key role in any negotiations to end the war, acting as a go-between with Taleban leaders including Omar.
Afghan and US officials have publicly acknowledged little success in efforts to re-start peace talks, which the Taleban suspended after accusing US officials of failing to honour confidence-building promises.
That setback refocused attention on nascent efforts by the Afghan government to open its own channels with insurgent intermediaries, despite the fact the Taleban publicly say they will not talk to what they deem an illegitimate “puppet” government.
Karzai, at a recent donors' meeting in Japan, also appealed to Germany to act as a go-between to revive talks, in a second track to contacts with Taleban leaders in Pakistan. A Western official said Pakistan's decision to grant access to Baradar would bolster hopes of greater collaboration between the two countries, but the Afghan government would only be fully satisfied if Baradar was repatriated to Kabul.
“It's a step in the right direction, but there's still a number of steps to go,” the official said.
Although Afghan officials may be pinning hopes on Baradar, it is unclear what influence he may have over a complex insurgency after spending years in detention.
Pakistan and Afghanistan agreed last month to resume regular talks on Afghanistan's peace process, with the new Pakistani prime minister promising to help arrange meetings between Afghan and Taleban representatives.
The Afghan government has established some contacts with the Taleban, who have made a strong comeback after being toppled in 2001, but there are no signs that full-fledged peace talks will happen any time soon.
US diplomats have also been seeking to broaden exploratory talks that began clandestinely in Germany in late 2010 after the Taliban offered to open a representative office in the Gulf emirate of Qatar, prompting demands for inclusion from Kabul.

 


AS IT HAPPENS: Davos 2020 Day Two: Middle East geopolitics and more

Updated 22 January 2020

AS IT HAPPENS: Davos 2020 Day Two: Middle East geopolitics and more

  • The World Economic Forum runs until Jan. 24 in Davos, Switzerland

The World Economic Forum 2020 continues today from Davos in Switzerland. Foreign ministers from the Middle East and North Africa are taking to the stage to talk about the geopolitical outlook in the region.

There will also be discussion panels on a range of topics including global financial markets, environment, science and technology.

Follow Arab News coverage here:

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14:45 - Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman joins a discussion on the future of fossil fuels. Also on stage were Colombian Minister of Energy Maria Fernanda Suarez, President and Group Chief Executive Officer of PETRONAS Wan Zulkiflee Wan Ariffin, and Total chief Patrick Pouyanne.

Prince Abdulaziz reiterated the Kingdom's commitment to developing renewable energy, saying Saudi Arabia is involved in a "transfromative effort."

The officials talked about supply and demand of the oil market. (Screengrab/World Economic Forum)

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13:00 - Alphabet Inc. and Google CEO Sundar Pichai takes to the stage to talk about Artificial Intelligence and its impacts on society.

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12:00 - World Economic Forum President Borge Brende is moderating a panel discussion on the Middle East and North Africa. He is joined Turkey's Minister of Foreign Affairs Mevlut Cavusoglu, his Omani counterpart Yousuf Bin Alawi Bin Abdullah, Prime Minister of Jordan Omar Al Razzaz, and Jane Harman, the president of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

Jordan's Razzaz said the world has "to be very careful about the sorts of intervention, regional and global, that we do."

He added: "Jordan… has presented a model, that shows political and economic resilience."