Shoura approves tourism strategy

Updated 14 October 2014

Shoura approves tourism strategy

The Shoura Council passed a bill regarding the general strategy for national tourism development at its 58th session in Riyadh on Monday.
The bill is a modified version of the tourism strategy adopted in 2003, Assistant Chairman of the Council Fahad Al-Hamad said in a statement to the Saudi Press Agency.
The bill has updated the strategy to keep pace with the modern developments in the country over the past decade and also to increase the role of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA).
The strategy covers the executive plan for the public and private sectors, the required programs, budget and proportion of contribution to be made by the SCTA and the government and private sectors. The strategy envisages the employment of tourism as an economic tool to generate more job opportunities for Saudis, the development of small and medium establishments, prompting balanced growth in all provinces and planning for balanced and sustained tourism development highlighting the cultural, urban and social dimensions of the country.
The Administrative and Human Resources Committee read its recommendations which included changes in the current regulations governing the recruitment of temporary and seasonal workers. It recommended limiting the period of temporary visas for seasonal work to a maximum of four months. It also recommended that penal measures be taken against violators of the regulation.
Al-Hammad said the council also discussed the annual report of the Zakat and Income Committee. The committee recommended speedy development of the new administrative structure and operating systems in the department for the improvement of its performance.
The council discussed the annual report of the Committee for Transport, Telecommunications and Information Technology. It demanded that the Ministry of Transport report on the progress in the implementation of the national strategy for traffic safety issued by the Council of Ministers, which aims to curb traffic accidents in the country.
The committee asked the Transport Ministry to come up with more information on the achievements of the public transport projects being implemented in various cities including the construction of cargo depots at city entrances.
While some members wanted to know the reasons behind a large number of roads in poor condition or without maintenance for months, one member asked for a comprehensive survey of the state of roads in the Kingdom and the allocation of funds for road maintenance.
Another member demanded to know why roads in remote regions were suffering from poor maintenance and one member recommended that ports be used for travel within the Kingdom to take the strain off surface transport.


ThePlace: Saudi Arabia’s AlUla contains Mada’in Saleh, the Kingdom’s first UNESCO site

Photo/Saudi Tourism
Updated 09 November 2019

ThePlace: Saudi Arabia’s AlUla contains Mada’in Saleh, the Kingdom’s first UNESCO site

  • The city was a major trade center and capital of the Lihyanite civilization

​​​​​AlUla is a governate and city in northwestern Saudi Arabia 110 km southwest of Tayma and 300 km north of Madinah.
The city, which was a major trade center and capital of the Lihyanite civilization (7th century BCE to 65 BCE), is famous for its archaeological riches, mudbrick dwellings and the AlUla Museum.
The governorate also contains Saudi Arabia’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site, Mada’in Saleh, which was built more than 2,000 years ago by the Nabataeans, the successors to the Lihyanites.
This photograph was taken by Dhafer Al-Bakri as part of the Colors of Saudi competition.