Briton in missiles-to-Iran case to enter new plea

Updated 01 November 2012
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Briton in missiles-to-Iran case to enter new plea

EL PASO, Texas: A federal judge has scheduled a new plea hearing for a British man accused of trying to buy missile parts from undercover US agents and illegally sell them to Iran.
Christopher Tappin had pleaded not guilty after his extradition from the United Kingdom in February. He was released on a $1 million bond in April and was scheduled for trial Nov. 5.
US District Judge David Briones issued an order last week scheduling a re-arraignment for Thursday of the 65-year-old in Texas. Tappin’s lawyer declined to comment on details of the plea hearing.
Tappin is accused of giving the undercover agents false documents to circumvent the requirement for defense articles to be licensed prior to being exported.
Two other men indicted in the scheme have already been sentenced to prison.


US takes back $100 million from Afghan govt over corruption

Updated 19 September 2019

US takes back $100 million from Afghan govt over corruption

  • Pompeo said the US will still finish the massive project that involves five power substations
  • He blamed the “Afghan government’s inability to transparently manage US Government resources.”

KABUL: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says Washington is taking back $100 million intended for an Afghan energy infrastructure project, citing unacceptably high levels of corruption in the Afghan government.
In the harshly worded statement Thursday, Pompeo said the US will still finish the massive project that involves five power substations and a maze of transmission lines in southern Afghanistan. It just won’t be spending the money through Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s government, blaming the “Afghan government’s inability to transparently manage US Government resources.”
This follows an earlier statement, also from Pompeo, calling for “credible and transparent presidential election” when Afghans go to the polls Sept. 28.
The 2014 presidential election was marred by allegations of massive fraud, as was last year’s parliamentary vote.