Coroner: nurse in British royal hoax found hanging

Updated 13 December 2012

Coroner: nurse in British royal hoax found hanging

LONDON: A nurse who passed a hoax call into the hospital room of the pregnant Duchess of Cambridge apparently killed herself three days later, with a coroner’s officer saying Tuesday she was found hanging by the neck and a detective saying she left three notes.
Coroner’s officer Lynda Martindill said nurse Jacintha Saldanha was found hanging by a scarf from a wardrobe in her room by a colleague and a member of the security staff at London’s King Edward VII Hospital last week.
Police detective chief inspector James Harman said Saldanha also had injuries to her wrists. He told the coroner’s inquest that three notes were found in the room. Police have said there were no suspicious circumstances, meaning nobody else was involved in Saldanha’s death.
As well as examining the notes, he said police were interviewing her friends, family and colleagues and looking at e-mails and phone calls to establish what led to her death. The case is being treated as an apparent suicide.
Saldanha answered the phone last week when two Australian disc jockeys called to seek information about the former Kate Middleton, who was being treated for severe morning sickness. The DJs impersonated Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles, and Saldanha was duped into transferring them to a nurse caring for the duchess.
Australia’s media watchdog, the Australian Communications and Media Authority, said on Thursday it was launching an official investigation into whether the radio station, 2DayFM, breached its broadcasting license conditions and the industry code of practice
Coroner Fiona Wilcox opened and adjourned the inquest until March 26.


16 dead as trains collide in Bangladesh

Updated 8 min 12 sec ago

16 dead as trains collide in Bangladesh

DHAKA: Two packed trains collided in Bangladesh on Tuesday, killing at least 16 people and injuring nearly 60 others, police said.
Three coaches were sent crashing off the tracks at Mondobhag station in the town of Kasba when a Dhaka-bound train collided with one heading to Chittagong.
“At least 16 people have been killed. And another 58 were injured. We have sent the injured to different hospitals in the region,” local police chief Anisur Rahman told AFP.
Cranes and other lifting gear were brought in to rescue trapped passengers, many of whom were asleep when the early morning crash took place.
“There was a loud noise, then I saw the train was completely ripped apart,” one injured passenger told Somoy TV.
“All the people around me were crying. There was blood everywhere. Some people had broken hands and legs,” another told the broadcaster.

Two packed trains rammed into each other in Bangladesh, killing at least 16 people and injuring nearly 60 others. (AFP)

“My son was with me. I still don’t know what happened to him,” the man added.
Hayat ud Doula Khan, a government official in the district, said the Dhaka-bound Turna Nishitha train, hit the Chittagong-bound Udayan Express at about 3:00 am (2100 GMT Monday) as the Udayan was about to go through Mondobhog station.
Khan told AFP that the Turna Nishitha train should have waited outside the station to let the other one pass. A Bangladesh railway official told reporters faulty signals could be to blame.
“Three coaches were badly mangled and the victims are from these coaches,” Khan said, adding that train services out of Dhaka had been halted because of the accident.
Train accidents are common in Bangladesh and are often caused by poor signalling or other rundown infrastructure.
According to the Shipping and Communication Reporters Forum (SCRF), a private media research group, between January 1 and June 30 this year, at least 202 rail accidents took place in the South Asian country of 168 million people where some of the track is a century old.
In June, a train plunged into a canal after the bridge it was crossing gave way. Five people were killed and 100 injured.
The SCRF said pedestrians using mobile phones while crossing tracks, negligence by railway employees and poor maintenance of lines and bridges were the main cause of accidents.