Wellness program launched

Updated 23 March 2016

Wellness program launched

Mandarin Oriental, Bodrum has announced a new collaboration with Mayo Clinic, a US-based worldwide leader in medical care, which is described as the first of its kind for the clinic.
Reflecting a joint commitment to wellness and a holistic lifestyle, Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program at Mandarin Oriental, Bodrum will combine the research-based medical expertise of Mayo Clinic with Mandarin Oriental’s signature treatments and therapies, offered in its spa.
With a focus on preventive wellness and designed to inspire a more balanced lifestyle, the wellness programs will offer guests a choice of tailor-made experiences from one day assessments to five-day retreats, as well as a la carte services.
Following a range of individual assessments executed by Mayo Clinic’s experienced on-site staff, including overall health, body composition, functional movement, stress and posture, guests will enjoy bespoke programs incorporating the clinic’s research-driven therapies and complemented by Mandarin Oriental’s signature spa treatments.
As well as healthy cuisine prepared by the hotel’s skilled chefs and wellness classes such as yoga, pilates and meditation, guests can take advantage of Mandarin Oriental, Bodrum’s rejuvenating heat and water Spa experience, first-class fitness center, indoor pool and tennis court.
“In today’s ever-changing, fast-paced world, expert guidance on how to lead a healthier, more holistic life is the greatest investment one can make. We are delighted to be the first hotel group to collaborate with Mayo Clinic to offer programs of this kind,” says Mandarin Oriental’s Group Director of Spa Jeremy McCarthy. “And the beautiful seascape of Bodrum serves as the perfect backdrop for a truly results-oriented wellness retreat.”
Mayo Clinic Healthy Living at Mandarin Oriental, Bodrum, which has already been made available from Jan. 8, will continue till April 30 April and is priced from 950 euros per person, per night.


Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

An international team of KAUST researchers studied whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for ‘Rope Reef’), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea on the Saudi Arabian coast.
Updated 18 November 2019

Whale shark hot spot in Red Sea offers new insights

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), whale sharks are considered endangered, which means the species has suffered a population decline of more than 50 percent in the past three generations. The whale shark is only two classifications from being extinct. Improvements and conservation efforts are in place, but there is still a long way to
go to protect these gentle underwater giants.
An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency using a combination of three scientific techniques: Visual census, acoustic monitoring and satellite telemetry.
Their six-year study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, tracked long-term whale shark movement patterns near the Shib Habil reef (Arabic for “Rope Reef”), a known whale shark hotspot in the Red Sea. The team monitored a total of 84 different sharks over a six-year period, and their results shed light on whale shark behaviors,
which could help to inform conservation efforts.
“The study takes years of passive acoustic monitoring data and combines it with previously published visual census and satellite telemetry data from the same individual sharks. The combined dataset is used to characterize the aggregation’s seasonality, spatial distribution, and patterns of dispersal,” said Dr. Michael Berumen, director of the Red Sea Research Center and professor of marine science at KAUST.

HIGHLIGHT

An international team of researchers, led by marine scientists at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and including researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in the US, has performed an extensive study of whale shark movement and residency.

They found the aggregation to be highly seasonal, with sharks being most abundant in April and May, and that many of the sharks returned to the hot spot regularly year after year. The study also shows roughly equal numbers of male and female sharks using the site, something that could be unique to Shib Habil. These characteristics indicate that this site may serve an important function for the wider Indian Ocean population of this rare and endangered species.
“Using the combined dataset, we can show somewhat conclusively that the aggregation meets all of the criteria of a shark nursery. This is particularly relevant given that Shib Habil is the only site in the Indian Ocean to regularly attract large numbers of juvenile females. Growing late-stage adolescents of both sexes into full adulthood is critical for sustaining a species. Management of critical habitats like Shib Habil and other aggregations will likely be vital for future whale shark conservation,” said KAUST graduate Dr. Jesse Cochran, lead author of the study.
There is a combination of factors contributing to the decrease of whale shark populations world-wide, including targeted fishing, bycatch losses due to fisheries, vessel strikes from boat traffic, marine debris, and pollution.